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Missing the point or what?

Discussion in 'Education news' started by blazer, Mar 20, 2018.

  1. blazer

    blazer Star commenter

    Shedman and stonerose like this.
  2. binaryhex

    binaryhex Lead commenter

    "Teach First recruit Grace Wickings, now teaching in a south London school, turned her back on investment banking to pursue teaching. “I’d just set up a charity in Kenya and realised money wasn’t everything, being happy in your job meant so much more,” she says. “I’d just seen the series Tough Young Teachers and the challenge really excited me."

    Mmmmmm. Clearly, she's not up-to-date with the suicide rate amongst teachers, the serious numbers with mental health issues, the exhaustion most suffer from, the drop out rates in teaching, the workload issue that drags on and on, the number of teachers quitting or taking early retirement, the poor salaries, the s6hite behaviour that stops you teaching anyway etc etc etc etc
     
  3. Jolly_Roger12

    Jolly_Roger12 Occasional commenter

    "All teachers in England and Wales must have QTS (qualified teacher status), which can be acquired while training for the one-year PGCE – long established as the classic and favoured route into teaching."

    In state schools maybe but academies can appoint who they like, QTS, or not. As @blazer said, I think a significant amount of this 'shortage' is caused by schools not employing the pool of unemployed, experienced teachers, who have been 'managed out' of their jobs. Schools are running short of compliant youngsters, who have not known what teaching used to be.
     
    JohnJCazorla, tonymars and stonerose like this.
  4. moscowbore

    moscowbore Occasional commenter

    No news here. I agree that the large number of qualified, experienced teachers who cannot find a teaching job is true testament to the true nature of the "recruitment crisis".
     
    stonerose and Jolly_Roger12 like this.
  5. phlogiston

    phlogiston Star commenter

    The paper version of the Guardian has a supplement on postgraduate courses with the link provided by @blazer .

    next to it is another article.
    https://www.theguardian.com/educati...llenge-but-it-will-come-back-around-it-has-to

    "While the education sector faces ongoing challenges with recruitment, retention is also a big problem – the exit figures are shocking. People are leaving teaching in droves. A lot could be done to take the pressure off teachers to make it a more attractive proposition."
     
    stonerose likes this.
  6. Jolly_Roger12

    Jolly_Roger12 Occasional commenter

    reminds me of a quote from Tolstoy. “I sit on a man's back choking him and making him carry me, and yet assure myself and others that I am sorry for him and wish to lighten his load by all means possible....except by getting off his back.”
     
  7. applecrumblebumble

    applecrumblebumble Senior commenter

    Well yes, I am a great belever that a lot in education goes in circles and I like to think of the positive. I have not heard any noises yet from Conservatives or Labour to indicate anything significantly positive.
     
    stonerose likes this.
  8. ravenscroft2

    ravenscroft2 New commenter

    No one forces people to train to become a teacher, nor to apply for teaching jobs...
     
  9. chelsea2

    chelsea2 Star commenter

    And your point is?
     
  10. binaryhex

    binaryhex Lead commenter

    The whole article is nonsense. The different routes into teaching are very muddled and confusing. There is no consistency between the different routes. The university route and PGCE was not perfect but it was something everyone understood and standards could be monitored and maintained easily. Experienced teachers have been gotten rid of and anyone who can is jumping ship.

    This is all about dumbing down educators and making them much cheaper. It has nothing to do with standards. And the Government has done a great job; teaching is not a profession any more. It's a poorly paid semi-skilled occupation in which you spend a little time making a difference and a lot of time managing behaviour.
     
  11. blue451

    blue451 New commenter

    The same poster has started a couple of threads over on the overseas forum, both criticising the British Education system, strangely enough on the basis of something which has happened in Spain, as though Spain was typical of International/British Education. S/he appears to have a gripe about something.
     
  12. Bequia2000

    Bequia2000 New commenter

    Eyes rolling...
     
  13. ravenscroft2

    ravenscroft2 New commenter

    Spainish employer's seem very keen on Spanish recruits having fluency in English. Hence the boom in English language schools. I m not sure why. Maybe it s just a hr trend....
     
  14. Mrsmumbles

    Mrsmumbles Star commenter

    You really have to laugh at the tragic naïveté of them all...
     
    stonerose likes this.
  15. stonerose

    stonerose Occasional commenter

    [QUOTE="binaryhex, post: 12433217, member: 4377419

    Mmmmmm. Clearly, she's not up-to-date with the suicide rate amongst teachers, the serious numbers with mental health issues, the exhaustion most suffer from, the drop out rates in teaching, the workload issue that drags on and on, the number of teachers quitting or taking early retirement, the poor salaries, the s6hite behaviour that stops you teaching anyway etc etc etc etc[/QUOTE]

    She's not up-to-date.......yet. :D
     
  16. sparkleghirl

    sparkleghirl Star commenter


    With or without the correct use of the apostrophe?
     

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