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Mind block- year 2 subtraction

Discussion in 'Primary' started by rainbowdrop86, Nov 12, 2011.

  1. rainbowdrop86

    rainbowdrop86 New commenter

    Complete and utter mind block!! Trying to plan my numeracy for this week, and after discussion with the numeracy co-ordinator, am focussing on number work quite extently as my class really struggle. Im looking at subtraction, and cant for the life of me think how they should be doing it. clearly with resources, they could just take objects away. On a number line should they be counting back or on. Im confusing myself, cos i think it should be counting on to help them with giving change etc, but then if its something like 20-3, surely its easier just to count back. Please help keep me sane!!!
     
  2. rainbowdrop86

    rainbowdrop86 New commenter

    Complete and utter mind block!! Trying to plan my numeracy for this week, and after discussion with the numeracy co-ordinator, am focussing on number work quite extently as my class really struggle. Im looking at subtraction, and cant for the life of me think how they should be doing it. clearly with resources, they could just take objects away. On a number line should they be counting back or on. Im confusing myself, cos i think it should be counting on to help them with giving change etc, but then if its something like 20-3, surely its easier just to count back. Please help keep me sane!!!
     
  3. Anonymous

    Anonymous New commenter

    The beauty of subtraction. Can be done both ways. I would start with "counting back" on a number line. Then think about bridging ten.
    I work with a bunch of very weak year 5's. They still struggle with the concept that you can do take away by counting on from the lower number. Very frustrating.
     
  4. carriecat10

    carriecat10 Established commenter Community helper

    Schools should have a progression in calculation policy which outlines how the teaching of calculations will progress through the school ... ask your maths subject leader about this.
    One of the key things is that children should understand the relationship between addition and subtraction so these should always be linked.
    Planning to use a range of vocabulary can help as children get fixated on 'taking away' when subtraction can mean so much more ... as difference for example.
    Help children to use their known facts when calculating otherwise they just end up counting ... either counting what's left when they have taken away or counting up in ones to find the difference. Either way you would want to encourage them to use their knowledge of bonds to move on from counting to calculating.
    I would recommend a book such as https://www.amazon.co.uk/Understanding-Mathematics-Young-Children-Foundation/dp/141294726X/ref=sr_1_3?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1321113265&sr=1-3
    Whatever you do, make it as practical as possible and use a context that engages the children.
    Hope this helps,
    Carrie [​IMG]

     
  5. To begin with I get them to use a 100 square and count back, just in ones to start with then go on to tens too.
    I also show how to use an empty number line and count back in ones/ tens, and also use the dienes (tens and ones wooden things) to do it practically.
    I usually do each of these methods separately and then they are able to decide which they prefer.
    I do also show them 'finding the difference' ie counting on but they find it tricky to do this without lots of constant guidance, as they don't get that the answer is how many jumps you have done rather than the number you land on, except more able (and I don't think I am that bad at teaching maths, honest!)
     
  6. minnieminx

    minnieminx New commenter

    This term we did counting back in ones on a blank numberline.

    The most able started with numbers up to a hundred and counted back up to twenty jumps crossing tens.

    The middling ones started with numbers up to a fifty and the to a hundred and counted back up to ten jumps crossing tens.

    The lower ones started with numbers up to fifty and counted back up to ten jumps not crossing tens.

    The very least able used a numberline ready marked up to 20. They started with numbers up to twenty and took away numbers up to ten.

    Yes they do need the counting back in tens and then ones and all that, but not necessarily just yet. You have all year to teach them and move them on. Better to get them totally sorted with the idea of taking away and counting backwards first.

    Oh and lots of practical objects for them to use independently. We used a giant numberline (A3 paper one number per sheet) and the children jumped along it. Then teddy jumped along a large number track. Then little laminated frogs, kangaroos and rabbits jumped along smallish numberlines. Then their whiteboard pens jumped along wipeclean numberlines and eventually their pencils jumped along paper numberlines and they were glued in their books.
     

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