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messy class

Discussion in 'Primary' started by ozzieskyhat, Feb 23, 2011.

  1. My class of year 2's are the messiest scrappiest I have ever had. Even the brightest ones seem to have chicken scrawl handwriting and dog earred corners of every piece of work. Lots of them need handwriting practice on the hour,
    Any one got some experience of sorting out a group like this? Maybe they've got it from me??[​IMG]
     
  2. My class of year 2's are the messiest scrappiest I have ever had. Even the brightest ones seem to have chicken scrawl handwriting and dog earred corners of every piece of work. Lots of them need handwriting practice on the hour,
    Any one got some experience of sorting out a group like this? Maybe they've got it from me??[​IMG]
     
  3. Very firm and clear expectations from the outset. I know what my Year 2 class are capable of and if they produce work that they know isn't what they are capable of then they do it again.
     
  4. They also need to be shown what you expect from them and I would really praise the children who are neat and careful and try their best.
     
  5. countrybumpkin

    countrybumpkin New commenter

    Mine have a tendancy to get lazy every once in a while. I refocus them by offering a crazy amount of stickers to the neatest work and tell them they won't know which lesson it'll be in that day (I usually give the winner about 20 stickers so their jumper is covered and then a few others a couple each!).
    Keeping them in might work for them to re do messy work but you would have to start this and do it consistently and not give up on a day when you are busy or tired.
     
  6. In a previous school children were given a numerical score for how well they did with the objective, how well presented their work was and how much effort the teacher thinks they made. Surprising how many are motivated to be more neat in order to get 5 5 5 and a housepoint.
     
  7. breadmaker

    breadmaker New commenter

    May be very wide of the mark here, so apologies if I offend. What is your classroom environment like? Is it tidy, orderly etc. or messy? Only reason I ask is I tried for years to get tidy, neat books and then one day, a non- teaching friend came to visit and pointed out that the whole ethos of my room said mess, untidy, unorderly so how could I expect the children to produce good work in that environment? 10years on, I still get a kick out of colleagues praising my classroom for always being the tidiest and most well-kept in the school! Good luck.
     
  8. thanks everyone
    Actually my class is very squashed and hard to keep tidy so its good that i have half term and can make a good start next week.
    I am going to make a massive effort so that someone can come in to my room and say how tidy it is!!!!!!!
    Doesnt help that my Ta is a little bit , shall we say, well chaotic. Cant blame her though, couldnt manage without her.
     
  9. flickaz

    flickaz New commenter

    Set aside 5 or 10 minutes at the end of the day, or even before lunch too if you can, to have a quick tidy. Get the children involved. If you can get the room sorted and tidy during half term it will be a lot easier to keep on top of it. When the children come back in explain to them that this is how the room is going to be kept. Give each child (or groups of children) an area to be responsible for. If their area is tidy then they can go to break or lunch. Will take some practise, for you as well as them, but will be worth it in the end.
    I'm not the tidiest person in the world, the kids laugh at the state of my desk, but the rest of our room is spotless and they don't go home until it is like that. Everything has it's place and 5 mins before hometime we stop and make sure everything is where it belongs. Oh and it helps that we have a big set of cupboards along one wall to shove stuff in when we get desperate!
     
  10. I sat my class in teams andgave each team a points card which they could put their team name on etc and awarded points at the end of every session/lesson/randomly when I felt like it (!) for tidiness. At the end if each week the table with the highest overall score got a big pile of housepoints (could be stickers for KS1 depending on your systems) then at the end of each half term, they had to add up each weeks score and the group with the most overall got a treat (usually chocolate) They absolutely loved it and I've never had such a tidy room! I also used to do joke 'inspections' of their pencil pots every so often for fun and make a big deal of having sharp pencils the right way up etc. I do agree though that having a tidy room in the first place makes a difference though.
     
  11. I did the same, admittedly they were older but should still work. I didn't even have to give them chocolate though ( can be bad if you forget to replenish stocks, and I used to raid the supply on a bad day!). I made some cheap cushions from some material found in school, enough so that the largest group had enough for one each and then the following week the group that scored the most points were allowed to use the cushions on the carpet, on chairs. They proved particularly popular during storytime at the end of the day too!

    The cushions were easy to wash (every half term or more if needed) and meant I didn't have to pay anything for them. The children worked hard to keep their work and their classroom neat and I didn't have to 'fix it' so that all the groups got them at least once, they were spurred on by the other groups to be 'the' group of the week.
     
  12. Make them redo it all at playtimes, it soon gets sorted then.
     
  13. Yes, that was a problem!! [​IMG]
     

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