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media coverage of supply teachers

Discussion in 'Supply teaching' started by duke1, Feb 4, 2011.

  1. Last week, the Daily Mail published an article about sending kids to bootcamps. Aside from the issue of the main article - in a 'box' of bullet points within the article, it was said in the actual printed version of the paper that 'some supply teachers charge schools up to £210' - or thereabouts, (when I checked the online article it read slightly differently at they can be expensive at £210 a day).
    Was very disheartened yet again at teacher bashing - but at direct implication that out of choice, we 'charge' schools up to £210 a day.
    We do not! - our agencies do, which, might I add we have no choice but to join due to the privatisation of the industry of supply - and we certainly do not get paid anything like the gross £210 a day charged to the schools by private agencies in our pay cheques, but more around the £135 mark gross for being top of our 'pay scales'. When I ask, in view of the public sector cut climate - is somebody going to tackle this issue for us and schools? Bring back LA supply pools! -then we'd all be better off.
     
  2. Last week, the Daily Mail published an article about sending kids to bootcamps. Aside from the issue of the main article - in a 'box' of bullet points within the article, it was said in the actual printed version of the paper that 'some supply teachers charge schools up to £210' - or thereabouts, (when I checked the online article it read slightly differently at they can be expensive at £210 a day).
    Was very disheartened yet again at teacher bashing - but at direct implication that out of choice, we 'charge' schools up to £210 a day.
    We do not! - our agencies do, which, might I add we have no choice but to join due to the privatisation of the industry of supply - and we certainly do not get paid anything like the gross £210 a day charged to the schools by private agencies in our pay cheques, but more around the £135 mark gross for being top of our 'pay scales'. When I ask, in view of the public sector cut climate - is somebody going to tackle this issue for us and schools? Bring back LA supply pools! -then we'd all be better off.
     
  3. historygrump

    historygrump Occasional commenter Forum guide

    However you contact the Daily Mail and tell them the truth and they will ignore it, they do not want the truth. They have a an agenda, is to destroy the role of supply teachers by over highlighting our pay. I am on (when I get work anyhting from £90 to £110 a day, so the idea that we are all £210 a day which they are seeking to promote among the ignorant masses is a disgrace.
     
  4. jubilee

    jubilee Lead commenter

    I'm on M6 and get £163 per daty gross for LA paid supply teaching. That sum includes a pro-rata amount for holiday pay. My LA agency obviously charge the school more than £163 for my services as they have to cover the employer's National Insurance contribution, the employer pension contribution, a share of their office/staff costs and an element of profit.
    If I were employed under the old LA supply register, I'd get the same £163 per day and the school would still have to bear the employer NI contribution, the employer pension contribution and an element to cover payroll and admin services.
    Schools cover all the above costs for their permanent teachers too!
    The perceived issue of supply teachers earning more than contract teachers (untrue!) comes about because permanent staff have their pay for 39 weeks spread across each month of the year. A supply teacher on the same grade cannot earn more than the annual pay of the contract teacher but has to be paid 'annual salary divided by 195 school days ,making their daily rate appear more than that earned by' a contract teacher.
    If I work 195 days per year (every day when contract teachers are in school), I will earn the maximum salary for M6. However, as a daily rate supply teacher I am hardly ever invited to work on the 5 INSET days when no pupils are in school, so I am £815 per year down on a contract teacher even when on a long-term placement where I attend all meetings, parents' evenings, write reports, plan and assess lessons. If I want to keep up with Career Professional development I have to
    attend twilight or weekend courses laid on by the LA , for which I am
    unpaid and for which I incur travel expenses.
    With so little work around for supply teachers at the moment, I still have to be ready for work each day in the hope that a last minute call will come through. That was not an issue for me a few years ago when I could rely on getting 3 or 4 days of work , on average, per week. Now that I often wait in vain for even one day per week, it is a big issue and one that is likely to see me decide that supply teaching is no longer a viable choice. If I am not alone in that decision, I wonder how schools will manage the long term absences of their contract staff (maternity leave etc) when the 'cavalry' of qualified teachers who usually step in to save the day have been replaced by a mum's army of unqualified cover supervisors?


     
  5. jubilee

    jubilee Lead commenter

    What the Daily Mail have done is to quote only the LA supply daily rate for someone in the London area on UPS3 or a teacher in England and Wales on UPS3 with the SEN extra daily allowance. That is not representative of most supply days allocated in the UK.
     
  6. magic surf bus

    magic surf bus Star commenter

    UPS U3 outside London and paid to scale with an agency fee of (say) £20 would be around £208. The Mail is simply quoting the highest possible outside London rate for journalistic effect.

    The Daily Mail's education writers are complete pillocks who struggle to put accurately researched or literate copy together as a general rule. Don't let them get to you.
     
  7. magic surf bus

    magic surf bus Star commenter

    With one possible exception - if the agency agrees to pay 'overtime' for after school events like parents' evenings, on top of scale pay. That can still happen in isolated cases, but it is (I admit) a technicality. [starts rummaging around for tin helmet]
     
  8. Unfortunately - I do know it to be true that schools are charged up to £210 a day for a teacher by agencies OUTSIDE of London - i.e. considerably further North - for two reasons I know this.
    Firstly - my friend is a Budget Manager at a school - she told me that she is in charge of the supply budget, and for full days, they allow £210 or even £220 a day for a supply teacher. This school is in an area where the LA has no supply school, and the school only use one very well know agency.
    Secondly - I have two school who have me on their LA books. The Depute, when she 'recruited' me, - with all the hassle of filling in application form, CRB etc just for supply (it took an hour with the secretary) - informed me that she needs LA people as they can't afford agencies. I am on M6 and SEN 1 and get paid this for this school - so agencies must be charging above and beyond for experienced teachers who insist on being paid the gross minimum of £135 a day as an agency worker - therefore probably explaining why my agency supply work is getter fewer and far between, as I have no idea what agencies charge them for me. I have no control over this - and thus, no control over how competitive I am in getting regular work.

    So agencies are charging the max where they can I think, especially for folk like me who want/need to be paid at £135 a day gross - even though this is still £20 less than the gross I would earn with an LA day without an SEN point. So the extra £65 is I assume being charged daily to the school, and pocketed by agency for their running costs of what appears to be large teams of 'consultants' (ha!) and offices etc
    With the public sector Review, surprised this isn't being tackled. Councils have no qualms heading alot of people towards redundancy who have trained at university, sometimes with Phd's for their line of work - yet the private sector in this case is not feeling the edge of the cuts - despite alot of those 'consultants' clearly not being a trained 'profession' like teachers. Meanwhile, as school budgets are 'ringfenced' in effect, so is the 'free riding' and waste of tax payers money.

     
  9. sorry 'pool' not school - and is that a £75 - £85 shortfall agencies pocketing.
    trying to cook tea at same time!
     
  10. jubilee

    jubilee Lead commenter

    I was talking about LA supply pay against LA contract pay for permanent teachers. When paid full daily supply rate, you do not get paid more for doing parents' evenings etc as you cannot earn more than 'annual pay divided by 195' for any one work day.
    Agency pay is rarely to scale; they have their own, lower teacher rate and only pay for the 5 contact hours, even if you do more work than that during the normal school day.
    When agencies agree to pay extra/overtime for parents' evenings etc, it still doesn't bring the pay up to the proper rate in Teachers' Pay and Conditions, because they are not subject to those payroll requisites.
     
  11. Media coverage of supply is - overpaid and waste of time.
    The journos have to write their copy
     
  12. magic surf bus

    magic surf bus Star commenter

    Some agencies have 6.5 hours as a full day, and pay for it, so that includes lunchtime. I agree that scale pay is becoming rarer, especially as agencies with LA contracts are renegotiating their terms as the new finacial year approaches.
    I'm aware of situations where agency rate 'overtime' is offered in addition to daily 'to scale' supply pay, but such circumstances are rare.
     
  13. greengirl57

    greengirl57 New commenter

    I would like to give myself on the back, not for getting paid £122/day by my agency but by the school I worked at for eight days as supply giving me a Reference stating that I was a 'very good' supply teacher and that they would have me back again! I really did like it there, I must say!![​IMG]
     
  14. greengirl57

    greengirl57 New commenter


    err.. I meant I would like to give myself a pat on the back....lol [​IMG]
     
  15. I thought that applies to all the Mail's writers. My opinion- they are horrible people who pander to the basest and darkest of human instincts of greed, self-preservation and xenophobia. My experience of their graduate trainees is that many of them are borderline socio-paths, who would have been burglers or con-artists in another life.

    Shame when most of them were young there weren't any SEAL interventions or citizenship lessons in place.... the world may have been a different place.
     
  16. There have been times (very rare) when I earned more than "day rate". Day rate equals 6.48 hours, and a school can decide that a supply can be given "overtime" on top of the daily duties, eg if attending an after school event. To do so they increase the hours for that day.
    Depending where I work, I get paid £135 or £122 by my agency, or £161 by the LEA in a "day rate" authority. (Or around £125 in an "hourly rate" LEA authority) If I am placed by a LEA agency I probably cost a fair bit more, when adding the agency cost is considered.


     
  17. "A supply teacher on the same grade cannot earn more than the annual pay of the contract teacher"-theoretically a supply can earn more than 195 days through working in different LEAs with different holidays. A few years ago my potential year was approximately 215 days, due to two half term differences and the Easter break being different.
     
  18. magic surf bus

    magic surf bus Star commenter

    Also true for me this year as I work in two neighbouring LEAs with different holidays. Even schools in the same LEA are opting for different holiday patterns this year. In theory I could work an extra 15 days before the Summer half term.

    In theory ;-)
     
  19. jubilee

    jubilee Lead commenter

    The limit on LA earnings (to no more than the maximum for your scale point) applies to work in one LA.
    In past years, when my neighbouring LAs had differing holiday periods, I did without some half-term breaks and also worked in August but I still never managed to earn the maximum for my scale point as work in September and July was usually thin on the ground.
     
  20. The bottom line is that HTs obviously place other things in front of qualified staff in the budget.

    What are these things?

    It's not like they pocket the change.
     

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