1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice
  3. The Teacher Q&A will be closing soon.

    If you have any information that you would like to keep or refer to in the future please can you copy and paste the information to a format suitable for you to save or take screen shots of the questions and responses you are interested in.

    Don’t forget you can still use the rest of the forums on theTes Community to post questions and get the advice, help and support you require from your peers for all your teaching needs.

    Dismiss Notice

Maths vacancies for older teachers-update

Discussion in 'Mathematics' started by GoldMaths, Apr 4, 2011.

  1. GoldMaths

    GoldMaths New commenter

    Dont put your age on CV test your theory. I would of thought an older candidate would be more attractive as they would not be travelling as much, taking time off for family and should be quiet mature.
     
  2. I am guessing that you are some way up the pay scale therefore I would say it's more likely to be due to how expensive you are in the current schools financial climate.
     
  3. PaulDG

    PaulDG Occasional commenter

    That doesn't work. Schools justify needing a full employment history on the bogus grounds of "safeguarding" (as if they could actually check who you worked for in 1975!) and an employment history that does start in 1975 is a pretty good indication of age.
     
  4. You've mentioned a CV a few times now - but aren't most teaching jobs now via an application form?
    Have you had anyone review some of your application forms? It could be that your "personal statement" needs tweaking. Are you changing it to reflect each different job/school?
     
  5. Nothing to do with your age. You just arent good enough in the eyes of the schools you are applying for.
    Please don't keep posting its about your age. First time you posted I think people assured you there were posts and it still holds.
    Why re you not good enough? no idea but its not because you are going to retire before other candidates.
     
  6. Karvol

    Karvol Occasional commenter

    Perhaps if you reread that sentence and then thought about how that point of view would come across to a school and what it says about your attitude to those in a management position, you would understand why schools are suspicious.
     
  7. True, but the point I was making was that if there were a large number of high quality applicants, the OP may have missed the cut on a mere technicality to restict the the pool of interviewees and hence may have been a very good candidate, in reality, for some of the posts applied for.
     
  8. What a ludicrous comment! I didn't state or imply that I believed I was not getting interviews because I was "perfectly fine" (whatever that is supposed to mean). My view is that that there are fewer posts than in previous years (partly because of the cuts) and that this means that older teachers-because they are more expensive-are less likely to be employed. I think that there are other factors, too, which militate against older teachers, e.g. the perception that they less likely to be receptive to current thinking on education etc.. J
     
  9. I have registered with four agencies and found them worse than useless: they promise everything but deliver nothing (at least in my case). All four agencies told me that my CV, references etc. were fine but have not come up with any interviews. I don't really want a so-called long term contract as , essentially, this only defers the problem. j
     
  10. I know what you are saying David, I enjoy teaching and if it came to the stage where I didn't then I doubt I would actually want a management job in a school.


    I don't have any great chip on my shoulder over those who are managers, though many of them are at best ineffective. I think David is correct though, in my experience anyone who stays a teacher does seem to get looked down on.
     
  11. Never have we let a candidate's age influence the shortlisting process

    I have no idea what the OP means when he says that his CV is good

    Letter of application is the most important characteristic when considering an application

    I then look at qualifications if the letter is good ... in the hope that they live up to the letter

    We have to have an application form completed as part of our safeguarding policy so need that rather than a CV

    If an agency sends through a CV for supply or short term I look at last 2 jobs to see if experience matches our school
     
  12. googolplex

    googolplex Occasional commenter

    I've never been in the position of being able to consider age when shortlisting. In fact - what is a short list? I've never even seen a long list!

     
  13. LiamD

    LiamD New commenter

    Wasn't the role of AST was designed to correct this?
     
  14. LiamD

    LiamD New commenter

    senility strikes again - this is what I meant to type:
    Wasn't the role of AST designed to correct this?
     
  15. Yes, AST is in theory 'of equal standing' to HoD. I've met several other ASTs and I'm the only one who has come to it through the ranks of main-scale teacher. The other people in my area are HoDs who fancied a change.


    For my own part, I'm never much fussed about school level policy, I've enough on with maths but I know that HoDs who made the switch certainly feel they lost influence within their schools. Hard to generalise, of course, just relating my experience.
     
  16. I think there has to be some recognition for teachers who do not opt to go down the management route
    Management and teaching are two very different beasts and I dont think its fair to penalise more mature teachers who have not opted to follow the management route.
    Anecdotally, I have worked with 4 'older' teachers who have it made in terms of their position in school.
    The results they churn out are that good that the school have wanted to keep them and as a result given a nice TLR for a fabricated role. They earn a nice little wage and dont have any of the hassles of SLT and it all stays in the classroom. Nice place to be IMO
     
  17. PaulDG

    PaulDG Occasional commenter

    There is.
    It's the same option that is available in most other sectors of employment.
    Namely that lip service is given by the employer to the notion of a "technical role that is the equivalent of a management grade" and that can get you a pay rise or two.
    But it closes off all future possibilities of promotion, takes you out of any areas of influence over policy - and puts you near the top of the list when cost savings need to be made.

     
  18. Why? Cuts mean there is less money to spend on teachers; hence
    schools are even less likely to employ older and moree expensive teachers. j
     
  19. I am not just talking Maths though

    As a Deputy, I shortlist a lot of subjects and age has never been used as a factor ... NEVER
     
  20. How about 'Post 16 transition coordinator'...oh yes..in a school with no 6th form or 2ic in a department of 3 and finally "Aim Higher Cooridantor". All true....ohhand stick on 'paid duty' to sit through lunchtime in their own rooms 'supervising' kids who are in internal seclusion.
    Sure, it certainly doesnt go but its certainly happening.
    Which one? Make up your mind...older teachers or more expensive teachers?
    Many are at the top end of the pay scale in their mid/late 30s

     

Share This Page