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Maths targets

Discussion in 'Primary' started by Raphella, Dec 20, 2011.

  1. Raphella

    Raphella New commenter

    Hey everyone, I would really appreciate some advice on maths targets! My school are having a big push on them this year, but we are being left to decide how to manage them within our own classes (although we do use APP for AFL) . I find literacy targets fairly easy to manage (I think because I feel more confident in it myself). I have made target cards and I rotate my targets depending on the unit we are covering, it also seems easier to use peer/self assessment in literacy for some reason.
    However, I am really stuck for a manageable system in maths, because what we are learning changes often on a daily basis. Every attempt I make, leads to the same result - irrelevant targets in books after a day or so, and so they are never met?! We are facing ofsted, smt learning walks and scrutinies to check on targets so I have to get it right ;-(
    How does everyone else manage it in their schools? Is there a really obvious system that I am missing?
    Thankyou in advance for any guidance or ideas xx
     
  2. Raphella

    Raphella New commenter

    Hey everyone, I would really appreciate some advice on maths targets! My school are having a big push on them this year, but we are being left to decide how to manage them within our own classes (although we do use APP for AFL) . I find literacy targets fairly easy to manage (I think because I feel more confident in it myself). I have made target cards and I rotate my targets depending on the unit we are covering, it also seems easier to use peer/self assessment in literacy for some reason.
    However, I am really stuck for a manageable system in maths, because what we are learning changes often on a daily basis. Every attempt I make, leads to the same result - irrelevant targets in books after a day or so, and so they are never met?! We are facing ofsted, smt learning walks and scrutinies to check on targets so I have to get it right ;-(
    How does everyone else manage it in their schools? Is there a really obvious system that I am missing?
    Thankyou in advance for any guidance or ideas xx
     
  3. smallschool

    smallschool New commenter

    I make all my maths targets from the 'Using and Applying' strand, so they are more generic for the copy in the childrens books. I then have, on the classroom wall, more specific ones for each block, that give examples. I laminate them and the children add a post-it as they feel they are meeting them. When they have evidence of all my examples I counter sign their book.
    Its alot of work the first year but it pays off in the second year. Prior to that I used the old numeracy strategy leaflets which get copied and sent home to parents. They were OK and at least the motivated parents had suggested games and activities, but they needed personalising.
     
  4. tafkam

    tafkam Occasional commenter

  5. I made blank laminated cards for the maths section of my targets display... write new differentiated ( 3 ways) ones weekly or twice weekly based on the work that week.

    Though I like the using and applying strand emphasis... might go that way.


     
  6. We don't have to have maths targets at my school. The problem with them is that because maths is taught in units or blocks of work, the children don't really get a chance to work on a target set, because we have moved on to another unit of work. The only realistic targets they can have are either linked to MA1 or learning tables/number bonds. Children who need support in these areas work on them regularly with a TA as an intervention.
     
  7. Maths does jump from unit to unit and setting targets can quickly become irrelevant when you move on to the next one. We use bookmarks that cover 2 levels to show where the children need to move on to. They are a little big and bulky, but really good value, and they solve the problem of never being out of date, as all the targets are the bookmarks, and they can last for as long as you need them to. Might be worth a look... http://primarytools.co.uk/pages/appsupport.html We use them double sided so that all strands are visible to the pupil and teacher.
     
  8. I declare my commercial interest and offer the following link that may be of interest:
    http://www.notasweknowit.co.uk/shop2.htm
    The same system of target sheets and supporting documentation is offered for mathematics, reading and writing. The system enables true continuous assessment and is best implemented as a whole-school approach. I have used this system with some success in a number of primary schools.
     
  9. tafkam

    tafkam Occasional commenter

    All children need support on Ma1.
    Ma1 is the most important part of mathematics! Why not set targets for it?
     
  10. I meant intervention on areas others have got but a few haven't such as tables. Children in my class spend 10 -15 mins with a TA working on this each day, whilst I push the others on. I agree we could set MA1 targets but we don't!
     
  11. ShadowMan

    ShadowMan New commenter

    Some people do not like doing this because the targets for Ma1 tend to be extremely broad and wishy-washy. There is very little perceivable difference between one level and the next. I struggle to see how Ma1 targets actually move the children on in their learning. It just ends up as a box ticking exercise.
     
  12. WolfPaul

    WolfPaul New commenter

    I agree, although I struggle to see how targets of any kind actually move children on in their learning; surely it's good teaching that does that.
     
  13. carriecat10

    carriecat10 Established commenter Community helper

    Totally disagree with your comment ... targets are only wishy washy if we don't make them clear, open, obvious, explicit to the children. I agree that it can be more difficult to measure progress, but this shouldn't stop us having targets linked to Ma1.
    IMO Ma1 is what maths is all about ... how many times have you come across children who don't know when or how to use known facts?
    Carrie [​IMG]

     
  14. ShadowMan

    ShadowMan New commenter

    Last comment was not at all helpful to OP. I'm not a fan of targets at all. In my view, we will only have to put up with the silly target setting culture for a while longer and there will be a back lash. We will all look back and laugh at the ridiculousness of it all. However, SLT demand it. The only way I have made it meaningful is to select one important topic that will be covered during a short term and provide must, should, could statements for the children based on that one topic. It quickly becomes irrelevant once the topic has been covered, as others have pointed out - but I ensure that I refer to it during warm-ups to keep that bit of knowledge in the pupils' heads.
     
  15. ShadowMan

    ShadowMan New commenter

    Sorry Carrie - we typed at the same time. I meant my comment was not helpful. Not yours.
     
  16. ShadowMan

    ShadowMan New commenter

    Yes, i agree. But I struggle to make my targets specific for Ma1 and so do others judging by online examples. Perhaps you have some specific ones in mind?
     
  17. WolfPaul

    WolfPaul New commenter

    Hope you're right!
     
  18. Have read all your replys so sorry if i'm repeating someone's else response.
    We choose a whole school target depending on gaps in their learning from tests, Apps and Teacher knowledge. Last year we covered mental addition, mental subtraction and time.
    This term we have covered problem solving. Our coordinator makes targets from
    'I can add 2 numbers on my fingers' all the way to 'I can add decimal numbers'. We give a baseline assessment on all these targets to every child in the school at the beginning of the term (every taget lasts a term), a half term assessment to see if they have moved up the ladder of targets, and an end of term assessment to see how much progress they have made.
    We must dedicate a whole lesson (or 2) to the target at the beginning of the term and just after half term and also 2 starters every week to the target.
    Depending on what target the child begins on and what year they are in, the target will either be red (behind for their year), orange (just under what target they should be on), green (they are where they are at for their year) and blue (exceeding where they should be).
    We display these on our working wall. I personalise by putting names on postit notes and sticking them on the specific target so pupils know which target they are on and can clearly see where to go next.
    Hope this helps, x
     
  19. I think that much of the difficulty concerns the word "target" itself. Probably few of us would disagree about being clear and specific about what a child needs to learn to move on to the next stage - and sharing this with the child. Whether we call them targets, assessment criteria or next steps, if they help the teaching/learning to be better focused, they are serving a purpose. More importantly, perhaps, targets/whateverwecallthem, should never stop the teacher presenting children with creative and interesting ways of learning.
    I repeat my declaration of commercial interest in this area.
     
  20. WolfPaul

    WolfPaul New commenter

    I never cease to be amazed at the amount and scope of prescription that exists in some primary schools these days. How, as a profession, have we allowed this to happen?
     

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