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Maths sub level descriptors

Discussion in 'Mathematics' started by hannajessett, Oct 8, 2012.

  1. Does anyone have a copy of the Hampshire maths sub levelling document, published in 2007. I have part of it and it is really helpful. I am trying to get hold of the rest to help with my assessments- I can't find it online anywhere!!!!

    I hope someone can help!!

    Thanks in advance.
     
  2. Does anyone have a copy of the Hampshire maths sub levelling document, published in 2007. I have part of it and it is really helpful. I am trying to get hold of the rest to help with my assessments- I can't find it online anywhere!!!!

    I hope someone can help!!

    Thanks in advance.
     
  3. DM

    DM New commenter

    It is the Government's intention to abolish National Curriculum levels. Just teach the children in front of you, don't waste a single minute worrying about what non-existent sublevel they might be.
     
  4. strawbs

    strawbs New commenter

  5. This sounds like bliss. But surely schools/teachers won't be left to their own devices to just teach as they see fit?
     
  6. DM

    DM New commenter

    It depends on whether or not the Leadership in your school trust you as a professional. I am aware that many teachers feel compelled to waste valuable time repeatedly weighing the pig instead of fattening it.
     
  7. I thought you'd say something like that. Alas my school is indeed a compulsive pig-weigher. The Head can't contain his excitement when he sees ticks, crosses, smiley faces, red blobs, green blobs, levels and grades next to children's names. The more the better, and at least several measures per lesson.
    I need a different school...
     
  8. DM

    DM New commenter

    Well one advantage of being a mathematics teacher is that you always have a several opportunities during the course of each year to seek employment elsewhere ...
     
  9. Tandy

    Tandy New commenter

    They don't exist. They never have existed. The notion of them is meaningless to a point of hilarity.
    So, forget about them and just get on with teaching mathematics.
    Idiotic headteachers who propogate the whole sub-level malarkey are only contributing to the continual de-professionalisation of teaching.
    As a teacher, your job is to do what is right for the kids in your care. They only get one, very brief shot at this, so I think you are morally obliged to tell your head where to stick sub-levels
     
  10. Just make them up, treat them with the contempt they deserve.
     
  11. They do not exist. My SLT were obsessed our lessons contained them last year. The OFSED document made to measure has help my case, but before that when my staff were observed my SLT I told my staff to make them, area of circle that's 6b. The atrocious book 'level up ' is used as reference.
     
  12. hammie

    hammie Established commenter

    my old reports were marked with c+ b- and so on, it worked for years and did not require book fulls of descriptors.
    I wonder if we could get a figure for the total cost of all the national curriculum folders, booklets, wall charts published and republished as they were superceded. Still it kept some educators out of the classroom and in well paid jobs! (or should that be none educators?)
     
  13. PaulDG

    PaulDG Occasional commenter

    As I work (once again) in a school which doesn't use levels, I can say the "C/B/A" system isn't great either and causes a lot of angst in the staffroom.

    If you give "10/10" that leads to the question "what grade will I get?". If you give an "A" for good work, then the child goes away believing they'll get an A in the GCSE despite the work being a D grade topic - and you can't give a "D" for work that's 100% correct!

    It was in the hundreds of millions - the last government called it "investment in education" and was proud to trumpet this spending at every party conference and to the newspapers at every opportunity.

    All those consultants who came into INSET days and told us how we had to teach in order to pass OFsted were also part of this wonderful "investment".
     

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