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Maths Marking

Discussion in 'Primary' started by greenpaddy, Mar 14, 2012.

  1. greenpaddy

    greenpaddy New commenter

    Just wondering how you mark maths esp in Juniors.
    Have just looked at an Ofsted report where it says - improving the consistency and quality of marking in maths, to ensure that all pupils understand how well they are doing and what they need to do to improve!
    When I taught in juniors, I would sometimes write something for them to remember like remember an odd number x 5 ends in 5 or show how they have gone wrong.

     
  2. greenpaddy

    greenpaddy New commenter

    Just wondering how you mark maths esp in Juniors.
    Have just looked at an Ofsted report where it says - improving the consistency and quality of marking in maths, to ensure that all pupils understand how well they are doing and what they need to do to improve!
    When I taught in juniors, I would sometimes write something for them to remember like remember an odd number x 5 ends in 5 or show how they have gone wrong.

     
  3. Firerose

    Firerose New commenter

    I teach in Year 4 and this is what I do:

    For the children who worked independently without an adult guiding them I use a pink and green pen as per the marking policy of KS2. For anything that shows good progress or achievement of the success criteria, I circle or underline in pink. I then use a green pen to circle or underline anything that is incorrect or shows a misconception. I then put a little I to show they were independent.
    For the guided group, I do exactly as above. Then I put a G for guided and write a positive comment in pink and a next step in green e.g.
    (sticker) Well done, Tyler.
    You were able to partition three digit numbers and arrange them into columns. (Pink)
    Now try by yourself - be careful when you are carrying over a ten as sometimes you forgot to add this as well. (Green).

    Then I give a CTG (Closing the Gap comment). this is a little mini activity to consolidate or revisit the skill:
    CTG -> Look at my example below. Can you spot the mistake and correct it for me?

    I do this for every guided group in Maths and the child then opens their book the next day to complete the task. It seems to work really well and Ofsted praised the system when they visited in the summer. (We are a small inner City Bham school with lots of EAL and SEN).

     
  4. greenpaddy

    greenpaddy New commenter

    Many thanks for this posting. I have just found something similar on the internet. We did not have coloured pens for different things in Year 4, but some of what you have posted is very similar to what I have done previously. The CTG information is really helpful.
     
  5. lardylegs

    lardylegs Occasional commenter

    I put a tick if it's right and a cross if it's wrong. In red. Sue me.
     
  6. reddevil

    reddevil New commenter

    Firerose I don't know how you have time to do that in every maths book and mark everything else as well. Any tips?
     
  7. Brilliant! Me too!
     
  8. TreesK

    TreesK New commenter

    There should be a 'Like' button on here. Me too hear hear
     
  9. minnieminx

    minnieminx New commenter

    I have taught year 5 and 6 for most of my career. All that time I never ever marked maths books myself. Children either self or peer marked everything and I never even looked at them. No-one ever made a fuss or asked why not. Children all made good or better progress, so teacher marking can't be all that important.

    Now I have year 2, many of whom cannot read well, I keep getting pulled up for not writing comments on the work and steps to improve. Utter flippin nonsense! One they cannot read it. Two I worked with them in the lesson, so I know what they wrote in their book so I don't need to look at it again later. Three they are making better than expected/good progress. Four who give a flying fig anyway?!
     
  10. I was reading this ofsted guidance this week and thinking similar thoughts about my marking of maths work with year 8 pupils at a special school (maths level 1-2 and v low reading ages).


    Surely the important thing is that pupils are given immediate feedback on their work. We do this during the lesson, talking to the pupil, so they understand the context and relevance of what we are saying. They then have the chance to respond immediately and ask any questions and can also make needed corrections.


    None of this will be evident in pupils' maths files though so some schools require indepth marking of each book, with pupils' replies and corrections being written beneath. I have worked in mainstream schools which required that - so I did it - but the way I work now is much much more efficient. I spend my time after school preparing good lessons rather than marking books.
     
  11. minnieminx

    minnieminx New commenter

    I do that too. But then some of SLT make a fuss about written marking! Grrrr!
     
  12. Yes marking seems to be a big focus with the new OFSTED criteria. I am a Y6 teacher and mark every question and evry child usually has a small extension question or a comment modelling a strategy or explain how they worked it out. It works wonders with the children but must admit is time consuming.
     

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