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match-funding for systematic synthetic phonics - WHICH TO CHOOSE?!

Discussion in 'Early Years' started by spannywinx, Jan 15, 2012.

  1. Hello!
    Our school is interested in purchasing one of these phonics schemes as part of the match-funding for systematic synthetic phonics offer. I have been looking at the individual websites but would really appreciate any opinions from people who are actually using these schemes. What are they REALLY like?! Are they useful for Phase 5 phonics as well? From what I've seen a lot is quite Phase 3 based...
    I was being drawn to Phonics Bug but think I might be confusing 'Bug Club' which isn't part of the scheme (from reading other posts on the site).
    Our school is looking for a scheme which has lots of appealing/interesting reading books and also interactive games on the whiteboard.
    ANY opinions would be greatly appreciated!
    Floppy's Phonics
    Phonics Bug
    Phonics International
    Read Write Inc
    Jolly Phonics

    Thank you!!
     
  2. Hello!
    Our school is interested in purchasing one of these phonics schemes as part of the match-funding for systematic synthetic phonics offer. I have been looking at the individual websites but would really appreciate any opinions from people who are actually using these schemes. What are they REALLY like?! Are they useful for Phase 5 phonics as well? From what I've seen a lot is quite Phase 3 based...
    I was being drawn to Phonics Bug but think I might be confusing 'Bug Club' which isn't part of the scheme (from reading other posts on the site).
    Our school is looking for a scheme which has lots of appealing/interesting reading books and also interactive games on the whiteboard.
    ANY opinions would be greatly appreciated!
    Floppy's Phonics
    Phonics Bug
    Phonics International
    Read Write Inc
    Jolly Phonics

    Thank you!!
     
  3. I just got some floppy phonic non fiction books. I only got them in phase two and three but i like them! My boys seems a little more interested in reading now
     
  4. fulloffun

    fulloffun New commenter

    we have also spent some of the money on the floppy phonics...we have Jelly and Bean as a reading scheme but they can be a bit 'dry' the oxford reading tree was always popular with the children.These new phonics books are going down well with the children and parents.
     
  5. sadika

    sadika New commenter

    Another vote for Floppy's Phonics!!!
    [​IMG]
     

  6. Jelly and Bean, of course, is not in the Phonics catalogue, because it failed to satisfy the government criteria.

    As the author, I think that some 'phonically irregular words' can be taught and learnt 'by sight'. I refuse to alter my position and say that these words should be approached phonically in the first instance. Children will always fail to get the correct pronunciation if they do this. This is not good teaching practice.
     
  7. Leapyearbaby64

    Leapyearbaby64 New commenter

    We have bought Floppy's Phonics, some of the (?) Project X (... something with X in it - another OUP series) and some Dandelion Readers. We have also booked whole school training, and I'm hoping after that the KS1 teachers will be persuaded to bin all the look and guess books for early readers ...
     
  8. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    We've bought more Sounds and Letters Floppy's Phonics, Phonics Bug and subscribed to the Phonics Bug e books
     
  9. Our school has used Read Write Inc for 6 years now. As a school we now get all our children able to read well with SATs results in both key stages in the 95% range ( with those not getting L2 and L4 being mostly recently arrived EAL children.)
    RWI works really well as it is so simple to follow, teachers and teaching assistants taking groups equally successfully. We will be using the matched funding to buy in the non-fiction titles which have been added since we first bought the progamme when it was called RML (Ruth Miskin Literacy.)
    We are also using Jelly and Bean as our home-school reading scheme and will continue to do so, despite it not being in the "approved" catalogue. I admire her sticking to her guns and not changing things just to get in the catalogue.
    RWI is in the approved catalogue and has "red words" which are like the ones Marlene is talking about, eg, was, is, my ,said, the and so on. Even though we are supposed to treat them as the other decodable words and then tweak the "tricky" bit, in practice this doesn't happen. They just learn them and get on with it.
    We just say, oh, you haven't learned the code for the tricky bits yet," and they accept it and carry on. And later on they do learn these things systematically on the programme. A few tricky words early on is not the same as learning loads and loads of high frequency words on flash cards.
    So, RWI is excellent and so too are the Jelly and Bean books!


     
  10. We have gone for Floppy Phonics, phase 1and 2 to consolidate phase 2 learning and to support children who need more practice at this level. We have also got phase 3 books to support those children moving onto phase 3 who might need a little extra practice.This allows us to send "reading books " home to all children, which pleases parents and they and the children seem to really like the books. Our main school scheme is ORT, so we hope to buy floppies phonics fiction /non fiction at some stage to move onto, when finances allow.
    We have also bought Dandelion Launchers, as I have used these before. We have used them to start off all our readers. They are good for readers who need to go at a slower pace, as they stay on single sounds and later double consonants for 40 books if they need to and therefore allow plenty of time for consolidation. We fast track more able readers through these and they are soon on ORT books.
    For our really slow starters we are sending home home the jolly phonics finger phonics as this is how we introduce sounds/actions and the children are familiar with them.
    What I would like more of on the market is books such as Jolly phonic read and see first words, to help children blend sounds into words - only 3 of this set are suitable for this purpose. I have asked them to consider selling them separately or developing more of these with no joy.
     

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