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Marrying a foreigner whilst working Overseas

Discussion in 'Teaching overseas' started by happygreenfrog, Feb 27, 2011.

  1. happygreenfrog

    happygreenfrog Occasional commenter

    Morning all
    I'm sure it has been done before but here we go. My contract is soon to run out - I'm in Indonesia - and I will return to the UK, before taking another posting (they tend to come along sooner rather than later). My career tends to be one where I have moved about a lot, either through lack of opportunity, circumstances or choice (not found the place I'd like to settle and possible retire to yet) and one doubts this will suddenly change in the short run.
    Anyhow, I'm very content with my local partner and we would like to stay together. Never really been one to value 'marriage' but appreciate to travel/work in many regions, marriage is all that is acceptable; further it is all that her very understanding parents would quite rightly accept, on moral grounds really. The big problem is how to do this. Having contacted the British Embassy they will not engage in personal emails/advice and simply referred me to a standard website, which of course deals with standard situations i.e. you marry a foreigner and plan to live in the UK and the need to be resident in the UK for 6 months to progress towards permanant residence, which will simply not happen in my case.
    You can guess the problems that may arise: I'm offered a posting and my wife is stuck in the UK trying to get a Visa for the new destination, only having temporary stauts in the UK. It opens a whole minefield of messy dealings.
    Any advice or links would be appreciated on any aspects of my dilemma, including the how to go about marrying abroad bit and if it is better to do it here or back home.
    hgf
     
  2. happygreenfrog

    happygreenfrog Occasional commenter

    Morning all
    I'm sure it has been done before but here we go. My contract is soon to run out - I'm in Indonesia - and I will return to the UK, before taking another posting (they tend to come along sooner rather than later). My career tends to be one where I have moved about a lot, either through lack of opportunity, circumstances or choice (not found the place I'd like to settle and possible retire to yet) and one doubts this will suddenly change in the short run.
    Anyhow, I'm very content with my local partner and we would like to stay together. Never really been one to value 'marriage' but appreciate to travel/work in many regions, marriage is all that is acceptable; further it is all that her very understanding parents would quite rightly accept, on moral grounds really. The big problem is how to do this. Having contacted the British Embassy they will not engage in personal emails/advice and simply referred me to a standard website, which of course deals with standard situations i.e. you marry a foreigner and plan to live in the UK and the need to be resident in the UK for 6 months to progress towards permanant residence, which will simply not happen in my case.
    You can guess the problems that may arise: I'm offered a posting and my wife is stuck in the UK trying to get a Visa for the new destination, only having temporary stauts in the UK. It opens a whole minefield of messy dealings.
    Any advice or links would be appreciated on any aspects of my dilemma, including the how to go about marrying abroad bit and if it is better to do it here or back home.
    hgf
     
  3. MisterMaker

    MisterMaker Occasional commenter

    Your wife can gain a visa for a country on her own passport, she doesn't need a British passport or naturalisation. You'll find the naturalisation process will take longer than 6 months as well.
    If you end up in the UK between jobs you will need a simple travel visa for your wife to get into the UK, but there is a maximum length of stay.
    As to the marriage itself, that will require checking with the authorities in Indonesia. Once you have the marriage certificate, get it translated and then registered with the British Consular Section.
     
  4. happygreenfrog

    happygreenfrog Occasional commenter

    Thanks for the response. I guess
    a) I realise the difficulties that my wife getting a visa for a country on her own passport can cause - need to visit embassies which maybe nowhere near where you live, lack of an embassy, and complications of providing documentation. We are presently planning a March trip to Japan and whilst i don't need a visa I have had to provide no end of documents to prove i am responsble for her and she has been 'interviewed' even though we are only going for a week of tourism.
    b) that restriction on the travel visa, the 'maximum length of stay', you mention for my wife being in the UK is of course disconcerting; what rules apply, how long do you get one for and is it a case of easily renewing, hmmm.
    hgf

     
  5. MisterMaker

    MisterMaker Occasional commenter

    Check with the consular section on current regulations, but it used to be 6 months maximum and can not be renewed in the UK (i.e. need to return to country of origin to renew). Under no circumstances overstay as this may seriously weaken the chance of further visas and the chances of resident status later on.
    [​IMG]
     
  6. happygreenfrog

    happygreenfrog Occasional commenter

    @MM 'i guess' was in reference to my points a) and b) which followed, but lacked a colon, rather than any form or sarcasm or doubt on my part.
    i appreciate your input on this matter.
    hgf
     
  7. AshgarMary

    AshgarMary New commenter

    On the assumption she is an Indonesian national, there is probably an official place for marriages to foreigners there.
    Here in Egypt, if a foreigner wants to marry an Egyptian, then for the marriage to be recognized Internationally (eg in the UK!) then it MUST be performed at the Ministry of Justice in Cairo. Other forms of marriage are available in Egypt, but are NOT recognized internationally, only within Egypt. The other alternative is to get your partner a fiance visa to the UK and marry there.(Though granting of such visas to the UK appears to be a complete lottery from what I have seen of people I know).
    So, have a look around for something like that. Your partner probably best google in whatever language they have over there.
    But check this out: link
    Here's some info on the marriage process - must be a religious ceremony and you must both be of the same religion. http://www.indonesiatravelinformation.com/Indonesian-marriage.html



     
  8. Do I get the prize for spotting the oxymoron?
    [​IMG]

     
  9. MisterMaker

    MisterMaker Occasional commenter

    Any signs of the replacement dictator down your way? [​IMG]
    I'm having fun winding up a teacher from Kuwait on another thread today. [​IMG] It's a quiet Sunday with little else to do.
     
  10. johnnersco

    johnnersco New commenter

    I can talk from direct experience here as my wife is a Colombian national. I think you will find that it will take 3 years for your partner to get British citizenship (if that is what you want), even with a ¨recognized¨ marriage certificate- I know of people who have done this, but I could never stomach the thought of returning to the UK to teach, let alone for three years. In the present climate, it would be difficult for me to get a job anyway (16 years overseas, Humanities specialist) I know that it can be a pain and expensive to get visas for practically every country (that is the situation my wifw is in) BUT she has never been denied a visa and good international schools will do their utmost to help. I found this in both El Salvador and Vienna. But, I did not return to the UK to find these jobs.....Might you consider staying in Indonesia?

     
  11. Hi, I can give you a little information that may be of help, although I can only talk about the situation regarding England and Europe at the moment.
    1) England. First off your wife would need to apply for the 6 month visa if she wished to journey to England for this period of time or less. The application needs to be made in your home country and the documents are things like letter of invite, where you are staying, bank statements, marraige certificate, details of how you´d finance yourself while at home etc.
    2) For stays of longer than 6 months in England , you can apply for the 2 year visa (this is fairly recent info but may have changed again). The only problem with this is that to get this visa your wife a) has to apply in the country that she is staying b) needs to be able to prove she can speak English to a basic level (a 5 year old is the standard I think)... this was going to come into force as of the 25th November 2010, not sure if it has or if it´s changed.
    3) For stays of longer than 2 years she needs to apply for permanent residence which means that she needs to pass the citizenship test (this is apparently quiet hard to say the least, but at least they have 2 years to prepare for it).
    4) The good news is this... for the Schengen Visa, to travel and live in Europe your wife automatically has the same rights as you do in the countries covered by the Schengen agreement. She will still need to get a Visa to enter the given European country, however the Visa can only be refused on the grounds of your wife being a danger to the people of the said country. For this Visa the country concerned can only ask for proof of legitimate and recognised marraige and and proof that she is either travelling with you or travelling to visit you. In practice they may well ask for travel insurance and booked flights before you go, although strictly speaking they cannot do this. This is covered by the right to free circulation of goods, people and money EU legislation. Please note this only covers the countries that signed the <u>full</u> Schengen agreement (of which GB was not one) and this only represents my understanding and not a lawyers view! However if you or anyone else should need help in this matter, I&acute;d suggest you contact SOLVIT, who will help deal with mis-application of EU law on this matter, or point you in the right direction.
    Two things worth noting here, this legislation also covers the dependent biological children (below 21) and the biological mum and dad of your spouse as well. The visa appointment and visa should also be issued within a reasonable matter of time and free of charge. All details pertaining to this can be found on the European Union Website in a variety of languages.
    This legislation applies regardless of the nationality of the spouse, if married to a citizen of the European Union.

    Sorry for the long reply, I just thought this might be of help to others if they also have any problems, even if this does not pertain directly to this case.
    Best of luck and good luck with the marriage too, and sorry for any spelling/grammar mistakes!
    Cheers Karl
     
  12. MisterMaker

    MisterMaker Occasional commenter

    If they select the 'sound on' option (it's a computerised test) ensure they turn the volume up to avoid this problem. [​IMG]
     
  13. I noticed....
     
  14. happygreenfrog

    happygreenfrog Occasional commenter

    Many thanks to AshgarMary (great links) and jonnersco (insight).
    My propsective partner has good language skills and would pass the present test standards but like you, have no plans to work back in the UK, and indeed find it difficult to compete with cheaper teachers given the usual financial constraints on school funds. The last time my contract expired i was in the Uk less than 5 months before taking on my present position, so it looks like my best option will be something similar to you yourself have found yourself in, though Ashgarmary's link, which suggests a requirement to deposit $50K to marry an Indonesian women would scupper our plans; I have no intention of depositing funds for an indefinite period in an Islamic Bank.
    I've contacted local International Schools for alternative employment but my best medium term option may be actually buying the small school at which i am currently working. Sounds rather laughable but feasible with a willing partner.
    Cheers hgf
     

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