1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

Marking - how often and how detailed?

Discussion in 'Modern foreign languages' started by Soloyo, Nov 17, 2018.

  1. Soloyo

    Soloyo New commenter

    Hi all,
    Following a recent marking review, my colleague and I have been advised by our LT (neither of whom are academic subject specialists, and in fact don't mark in their subject until KS4) that we are marking too much... which has led us to question how much marking other colleagues are doing?
    When we mark books, we check notes through for spelling mistakes in TL to avoid misconceptions, stamp self-marked class activities and have a tick sheet based on GCSE grade criteria which we use for written pieces; we mark these for spelling, grammar and content using the tick grid, give a positive comment and then choose a target for development. We also QC peer-assessments with a quick comment.
    We've been marking this way for the ten years we've worked together; we've always believed MFL was one of the heavier subjects in terms of marking and have accepted this as par for the course. But now we need to know... are we doing too much?!
    Any opinions gratefully received -
    Soloyo
     
    pascuam49 and Lara mfl 05 like this.
  2. install

    install Star commenter

    Marking within some lessons and with groups of students on rotation - so that each book is marked at least once every three weeks.

    No comments allowed ( as in real final exams) - just highlighting, underlining, letters and symbols to signify issues and then a grade awarded :cool:
     
    Lara mfl 05 likes this.
  3. Caity52

    Caity52 New commenter

    I don't know how you manage with no comments allowed install. I appreciate that's what happens in final exams but surely the point of formative assessment is that you give some sort of advice for how to improve. Sometimes the underlining/highlighting may be enough but the word "allowed" implies that you can't write a short explanation or give an example even if you want to. That sounds overly prescriptive and not in the interests of pupil development. The OP's marking sounds very similar to what I would do and as a parent I would be very disappointed if my child didn't receive any written feedback until KS4. The written feedback is useful to us as parents as well to see whether our child is on track and to support them to understand their mistakes if necessary.
     
    cathr likes this.
  4. install

    install Star commenter

    Thankyou - the teachers love it as it reduces their workload. Students are not overly spoonfed. I'd like to see even less. Each to their own and happy marking :):):)
     
    Last edited: Nov 20, 2018
  5. Eflmeister

    Eflmeister Occasional commenter

    Are you an MFL HoD and this is your policy? Or are you a headteacher @install and this is how you help manage workload? Have you looked at how such marking impacts on student outcomes? I'm just curious :)
     
  6. cathr

    cathr New commenter

     
  7. cathr

    cathr New commenter

    I am also puzzled! If a student had written 'après qu'il ait fait ses devoirs', it would be charitable to, not only underline the error, but also give a reference as to where he/ she could find the explanation for the mistake, and the correct format.
     
  8. cathr

    cathr New commenter

     
  9. cathr

    cathr New commenter

    Should the parent of said student be a native speaker, they may also be grateful as many natives make that mistake...:):p
     
  10. SEBREGIS

    SEBREGIS Senior commenter

    My schools policy is really good - one piece of solid, feedback marking per half term, and then the rest can be whatever you need to do in order to 'know where the students are'. So if you are teaching a GCSE class you can mark every lesson if you want to, but you don't HAVE to - as long as you can confidently say you know how they are doing, and THEY know how to make progress.

    In practice, we all still do a lot of marking, but that's because we see the need of it. Its not done because the Insect Overlords demand sacrifice...
     
    mymintpark and pascuam49 like this.
  11. Caity52

    Caity52 New commenter

    That sounds great Sebregis, I am all for teachers having autonomy over what is necessary from a feedback point of view. I like to use marking as a chance to give pupils some written explanation to refer back to if they are making a specific mistake but it isn't always necessary and I wouldn't want to be in a situation where I was obliged to say something about every piece of work they write.
     
    pascuam49 likes this.
  12. install

    install Star commenter

    I prefer to encourage independent reactions, thinking, learning and a process of finding the best answer rather than a continual cycle of spoon feeding. :cool:
     
  13. Caity52

    Caity52 New commenter

    I don’t think marking is spoon feeding- at least, it shouldn’t be- but it is a process of identifying misconceptions and addressing these with the pupils. If pupils have been excessively spoonfed the reality is that you wouldn’t need to mark at all because their work would be a regurgitation of what you had already put in and marking would be no more than ensuring this regurgitation was accurate, however if you want them to be creative and independent, marking is the chance to feed back on an individual basis and then pick up common themes with the class if necessary.
     
    pascuam49 likes this.
  14. install

    install Star commenter

    Bad marking eg with detailed comments repeated can be an example of spoon feeding - often leading to the same mistakes being made and commented on over and over again.

    Yes I am all for the individual learning journey with students taking responsibility for their errors and finding out what would have been better. :)
     
  15. install

    install Star commenter

    Although not following the school policy and doing something 'more' makes life difficult for those that do want consistency, an agreed approach and a way forward.

    It actually undermines others and the whole school:rolleyes:
     
    1 person likes this.
  16. Eflmeister

    Eflmeister Occasional commenter

    I agree, but I was just wondering with my other comment if your views were actually something you’ve implemented and seen the results or what you would like to happen?
     
  17. install

    install Star commenter

    You are clearly doing too much ..:cool:
     
  18. Eflmeister

    Eflmeister Occasional commenter

    But can you please just say in what capacity you are speaking? Have you implemented the ideas you mentioned previously in this thread or are they what you’d like to see happening? I’m genuinely curious as to whether your suggested method in earlier posts has yielded results for students. :)
     
  19. SEBREGIS

    SEBREGIS Senior commenter

    I understand what you mean, but a school policy can only be general. Some subjects and some classes need more. I have year 7 RS classes who really don't require as much marking as they get. And year 10 GCSE history classes who need as much as I can give them.

    Its a bit like - how much should you water a plant?
     
  20. install

    install Star commenter

    Hmmmm..'Watering a plant' suggests that the learner is only reliant on a teacher's comments in order to make progress. Yet, the learner has many other sources now at hand - more than ever before. The teacher marker is not the fount of all knowledge any more....but they are the facilitator. They can make independent learning happen rather than spoon feeding or 'watering'...
     
    1 person likes this.

Share This Page