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Managers expert at hiding the truth

Discussion in 'Heads of department' started by managersshouldmanage, Jul 9, 2012.

  1. managersshouldmanage

    managersshouldmanage New commenter

    I am a teacher in an inner city school, have worked in inner city schools for the last ten years, and previously worked in the engineering sector.
    Thereal root cause of much underachievement and problems, management. In particular middle management.
    Schools are notorious at promoting people beyond their capability, beyond their skills and give them a level of protection that makes them almost untouchable or unaccountable.
    Having worked in a number of schools at varying levels, I have seen promotions of staff who are so incompetent and feel their sole role is to lay blame for the path of disgusting mistakes they have made on the way up.
    The higher someone goes the less teaching time, more free hours and more control to delegate needless tasks to over burdened teaching staff who carry the workload.
    This is not isolated to the few.
    I have witnessed managers who are not capable of calculating their own budget, unable to identify under performing students, incapable of teaching good lessons, unwilling to take responsibility, unwilling to deal with behaviour, unlikely to listen.
    It is so disappointing to have to identify these problems but no one seems to be able to keep a check on those abusing the system.
    It seems to me that the majority of middle management use this route to hide their inabilities away. They seem expert at hiding poor results under the carpet, and inadequate relationships with children.
    We are employed to teach, management is an additional tlr.
     
  2. managersshouldmanage

    managersshouldmanage New commenter

    I am a teacher in an inner city school, have worked in inner city schools for the last ten years, and previously worked in the engineering sector.
    Thereal root cause of much underachievement and problems, management. In particular middle management.
    Schools are notorious at promoting people beyond their capability, beyond their skills and give them a level of protection that makes them almost untouchable or unaccountable.
    Having worked in a number of schools at varying levels, I have seen promotions of staff who are so incompetent and feel their sole role is to lay blame for the path of disgusting mistakes they have made on the way up.
    The higher someone goes the less teaching time, more free hours and more control to delegate needless tasks to over burdened teaching staff who carry the workload.
    This is not isolated to the few.
    I have witnessed managers who are not capable of calculating their own budget, unable to identify under performing students, incapable of teaching good lessons, unwilling to take responsibility, unwilling to deal with behaviour, unlikely to listen.
    It is so disappointing to have to identify these problems but no one seems to be able to keep a check on those abusing the system.
    It seems to me that the majority of middle management use this route to hide their inabilities away. They seem expert at hiding poor results under the carpet, and inadequate relationships with children.
    We are employed to teach, management is an additional tlr.
     
  3. If the situation that you describe is happening in your school then it also points to poor leadership a the top.
    But it is the case that it is quite hard to do something about middle managers that are underperforming for any reason unless you are determined as a school leader. Neverthless, it is unacceptable for school leaders to neglect a situation like this because it can lower morale, cause good people to leave, and affect the results of a department.
    Performance management arrangements ought to be good enough to pick up on teachers that need to improve, including middle managers. It depends on good systems, including effective use of data, and to start with the consequences of underperformance to set targets for improvement, or make changes to responsibilities.
     
  4. casper

    casper New commenter

    True, however. I know of a case where performance management documents were lost by the Head. So no targets for the previous year could be discussed. I am not sure what would happen if any of the staff concerned wanted to move schools and their PM documents forwarded to their new posts??
     

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