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Making a UCAS application with only a vague idea of my GCSE results

Discussion in 'Thinking of teaching' started by frank134, Nov 22, 2015.

  1. frank134

    frank134 New commenter

    Hi,

    I feel I know the answer to this but I thought I'd ask anyway...

    Having sweated over my personal statement, I was hoping to submit my UCAS application in the coming week or so. However, when I got to the Education section I hit a stumbling block in that I can't recall my GCSE results nor the awarding organisation. I know that I got eight GCSEs, of grade C or above, and that these included English and Maths but I can't recall the exact grade nor what others I got.

    I've just been onto the AQA website and it seems I can request this information, for a fee, but that a response can take up to 28 working days - I was hoping to get this done and dusted well before Christmas. I should point out that I did my GCSEs in 1989. Given that's 26 years ago, do you think I'll get away with being pretty vague on my results? I'm going to give UCAS a call tomorrow and see what they say...

    Regards,

    Michael
     
  2. AHAteacher

    AHAteacher New commenter

    Hi
    I have applied and got two interviews lined up within the next couple of weeks, they do request you to bring some documents for the interview one of them is your GCSE certificate. So it is very important, I hope you can get yours soon, hope this helps, good luck.
     
    crookesm1 likes this.
  3. Findlotte

    Findlotte Established commenter

    As above said, they will want copies of every qualifications you put on the application.

    Possibly ask your school? Or school friends? But looks like you're going to have to pay for new certificates.
     
    crookesm1 likes this.
  4. mandala1

    mandala1 Occasional commenter

    If you were absolutely sure of a grade C or above (but vague about how far 'above') then just put 'C' for your grades. You will need to produce original certificates though, so go to your school in the first instance, then the exam board. Yes, it costs money to have certificates re-issued.
     
    crookesm1 likes this.
  5. frank134

    frank134 New commenter

    Thanks for all your advice - my old school has just put a copy of my results in the post - on headed paper. Once I get it, I'll see how official it looks (to me anyway) before deciding whether to apply for an 'official' certificate from the AQA.
     
  6. AHAteacher

    AHAteacher New commenter

    Hi
    Just to let you know they do ask for the certificate issued by the examining body. I had my interview yesterday and someone who had a school certificate been told to pay and get the AQA one. They said they cant make an offer until they have seen it as its a 'must' for teacher training. Good luck.
     
  7. mandala1

    mandala1 Occasional commenter

    Yes, you will need certificates or confirmation from the awarding body. A letter from your school won't be enough.
     
  8. rolls

    rolls Occasional commenter

    You have not said which course you are applying for. If it is a QTS course then you will definitely need your certificates before you start the course as this is a government requirement. However, many universities may accept the letter from your school at this stage as most candidates will not have met all the requirements as most will not have passed the QTS skills tests yet. If it s a work based route starting with a non QTS foundation degree then you may be given a bit more leeway until you get to the QTS stage. Whatever the route do not delay your application waiting for certificates. It looks like the Department of Education may close down many application systems early this year so get yourself into the system and iron out difficulties later.
     

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