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M4-UPS3? Better watch out...

Discussion in 'Education news' started by lanokia, Nov 7, 2015.

  1. lanokia

    lanokia Star commenter

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-34712887

    Nearly two-thirds of school leaders (64%) in England are making significant cuts or dipping in to reserves to fill deficits, a head teachers' union warns.

    The National Association of Head Teachers says increased employer costs for national insurance and teachers' pensions will put schools under strain.

    The NAHT says heads are having to cut back on areas such as equipment, maintenance and teaching assistants.

    The Department for Education said it was protecting the schools budget.

    The NAHT's questionnaire of 1,069 school leaders (the majority of whom, 82%, were primary heads) found that:

    • over three-quarters (76%) of heads were using reserves
    • 64% were reducing investment in equipment
    • half were reducing their maintenance budget
    • 49% were reducing numbers or hours of teaching assistants.
    The onslaught on long-standing experienced teachers will continue. Beware...
     
  2. lanokia

    lanokia Star commenter

    And M4 was pretty arbitrary really... I know someone being shafted in M3.
     
  3. spartacus123

    spartacus123 Occasional commenter

    Yet there's all this money available to build free schools and academies.:confused:
     
    monicabilongame and lanokia like this.
  4. lanokia

    lanokia Star commenter

    Aye... odd that...
     
  5. foxtail3

    foxtail3 Star commenter

    So, in future, as a classroom teacher, your starting salary will probably become your finishing salary? No career progression, unless you're going to be a 'leader.' How does that work with the plan to put 'super teachers' in needy schools?
     
    monicabilongame likes this.
  6. lanokia

    lanokia Star commenter

    I doubt that is the plan... it's more likely a case of 'announce something so you look like you doing something'.

    So they've announced it... nothing will then be done, it'll become an interesting little piece in Private Eye in a few years time.

    Meanwhile the implosion of education will continue.
     
    vinnie24 and monicabilongame like this.
  7. -myrtille-

    -myrtille- Occasional commenter

    Eek, this is a bit scary.

    My school is quite good at pay progression - I went up from M2 to M4 at Easter in my 2nd year of teaching, and a colleague who has been teaching a couple of years' longer than me went from M4 to M6.

    But if the purse strings need tightening I can't imagine we'll be getting further pay rises and will be expected to do more to justify the rises we've had.
     
    monicabilongame likes this.
  8. applecrumblebumble

    applecrumblebumble Lead commenter

    The report also points out that they are finding it difficult to recruit senior positions and NQT's were insufficiently skilled with behaviour management and subject knowledge to start teaching. The whole thing is about saving money, Nicky Morgan will simply move money around to pay for new initiatives. Teach first will lose some money to pay for the new elite teachers. They are only interested in getting to a leadership position so they don't have to dirty their hands too much; assuming the kids don't destroy them first. Getting rid of teachers on the higher end of the salary has been going on for at least 5 years. I also noticed that the independent sector is having difficulty recruiting staff, there solution is to recruit unqualified staff (no teaching qualification) just like some academies this year.
     
    monicabilongame likes this.
  9. Yoda-

    Yoda- Lead commenter

    Fragmentation of the work place. Variations in conditions of service. The abolition of national pay scales. These were always going to damage pay progression.

    Performance management is the excuse often given to members of staff for their lack of pay progression.

    In truth the largest cost a school has is the wage bill. When money gets short pay progression will stop for some teachers. Which teachers will suffer will depend on the school. It is unlikely that this will be a transparent process.

    “Pay progression and reward – a Jedi craves not these things”

    – Yoda????
     
    lanokia likes this.

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