1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

Lungs

Discussion in 'Science' started by uk2020, Jan 14, 2012.

  1. Hi all,
    Does anyone know or have any ideas on how to start off teaching Y6 children about the lungs? Would like to try an experiment. Or, could anyone suggest any activities to do with the lungs?
    Thanks,
     
  2. Hi all,
    Does anyone know or have any ideas on how to start off teaching Y6 children about the lungs? Would like to try an experiment. Or, could anyone suggest any activities to do with the lungs?
    Thanks,
     
  3. blazer

    blazer Star commenter

    Breathing rate before and after exercise

    Balance a long stick (broom handle). attach deflated ballons to each end and establish a balance. Blow up one balloon with air from the lungs. and reattach. It will be heavier that the other balloon because CO2 is denser (heavier) than air.

    get a 'pluck' from a butcher and show the kids real lungs? You will also get a heart etc as well.
     
  4. Cosmic_Rainbow

    Cosmic_Rainbow New commenter

    also use a sponge to show the structre of the alveolli and dip it in water to show how much extra water it can hold then relate this how much air the lungs can hold
     
  5. blazer

    blazer Star commenter

    You can measure lung capacity with a washing up bowl and a large pop bottle (3 litre) and a short length of tubing. Fill bottle and invert in bowl of water. Blow through tube into bottle to displace water. measure water left and take away from 3000ml to find out lung capacity. OK the lungs never totally empty but don't tell them that! Alternativly inflate a balloon with one puff and measure it's volume by displacment. Loads of numeracy there!
     
  6. Take a small plastic bottle,cut the bottom off. Cut the neck off a balloon and stretch the balloon over the cut end of the bottle; seal with elephant tape. place a balloon inside the neck of the bottle, stretching the neck of the balloon over the neck of the bottle. If you pull on the bottom balloon, the top one should inflate - a model of the lungs - you can then discuss how this relates to the body, getting pupils to feel how the ribs move up and out during breathing - so increasing the thoracic cavity and drawing air into the lungs. Pushing you balloon diaphragm should push air out of the lungs.
     
  7. You have to be careful with that explanation though. The major reason that the full balloon sinks is because the balloon squeezes the air into a smaller volume and is therefore more dense than the surrounding air.
     
  8. blazer

    blazer Star commenter

    I know but don't tell the kids!
     

Share This Page