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Lung dissection

Discussion in 'Science' started by netball_bunny, Dec 5, 2005.

  1. Going to chop some lungs up on Wednesday, its a respiratory system lesson. Been trying to find some guidance on how to proceed with this on t'internet but not found anything - does anyone have any foolproof(ish) instructions or failing that any pearls of wisdom to share?

    One last thing, why is the cartilage C shaped? I know it is, but I need to know why before they ask me that.

    Thanks in advance.
     
  2. Going to chop some lungs up on Wednesday, its a respiratory system lesson. Been trying to find some guidance on how to proceed with this on t'internet but not found anything - does anyone have any foolproof(ish) instructions or failing that any pearls of wisdom to share?

    One last thing, why is the cartilage C shaped? I know it is, but I need to know why before they ask me that.

    Thanks in advance.
     
  3. bogstandardcomp

    bogstandardcomp New commenter

    Rubber gloves, rubber or plastic tube + disinfectant for the end you blow. Lungs in a tray.

    Lungs can be inflated to great effect and delight of the squirming kids, some people blow, me (is this still safe?), others use a pump of some sort. THe tube sometimes has to be held in the trachea to avoid air loss. And it deflates(elastic tissue)by itself. Very Pink cos of extensive blood vessels.

    For the cartilage, roll a piece of paper up and ask a kid to suck one end while the other end is closed. It collapses, hence the cartilage. I usuasly also show a piece of vacum cleaner pipe which also has rings or spirals for the same reason.

    I finish by putting it in a plastic bag and allowing them to pick it up and/or squeeze it to feel how light and spongy it is.

    Also invite them for a fry up after school!
     
  4. General advice is to NOT blow them up by mouth, I find that a decent bicycle hand pump does the job OK.
     
  5. HMK

    HMK

    You must not blow through a tube with your mouth to inflate lungs...........does anyone take any notice of the health & safety rules & regs??

    You must also have the lungs in a transparent bag to contain any nasty 'mist' that could spray into the air from any damage/cuts caused at the abattoir. It tells you all this in CLEAPSS, though when I had a very quick look just now, I couldn't find the info.

    It's not just about being safe, it's about showing 'good practice' in front of your students & that you are a 'professional'.
     
  6. When my teacher did this when I was in secondary school (a few years ago, but not that long!) various members of the class were invited to inflate the lungs themselves! I can't imagine that being allowed now though. Hope this goes well - always good to have a few squeamish moments. I'm looking forward to doing this one (I'm hopefully doing a PGCE starting September).
    ~Saz
     
  7. The cartilage is C shaped to prevent friction against the oesophagus during swallowing.
     
  8. I had been wondering about the old health and safety too. Not allowing kids to blow it up (though I know already that the front row will all want a go anyway). HOD said they could give it a poke if they wore rubber gloves but I don't reckon there'll be enough to go round anyway. I suggested bicyle pump actually, but all consulted at the school said blowing was ok as long as i avoided suck-back (eeeuuyyuuh) and it was disinfected.

    Will check on the plastic bag thing, but i can't see it being much use, would then end up chopping fingers instead - even worse h&s! Kids will be kept at good difference though.

    Cartilage info all very good, thanks very much all.
     
  9. According to boardworks the C shap is to allow windpipe to expand and allow more air intake. I did this last week and blew down the tube into lungs did not realise what alveoli were so elastic and got dead pigs breath (which the kids loved) would advise taking the precautions outlined earlier. Really made me feel like a teacher and things like that get the kids respect
     
  10. PS why don't they do things like this on PGCE instead of the useless drivel they come out with
     
  11. bogstandardcomp

    bogstandardcomp New commenter

    Cartilage also makes it had to strangle pupils, quickly and quietly.

    I cannot vouch for this personally, but Bart is the living proof.
     
  12. well... no joy on the lung inflation - the lungs were really well slashed and I couldn't hold them together enough and the pipe in the bronchus all at the same time, shame!! Demo went reasonably well, was made harder by the gloves supplied by the school though, they were just massive, it's nearly an all girl department too so they really should have smaller ones!
     
  13. Can someone tell me what learning outcomes one would hope to acheive through lung dissection and how best to go about it?

    From what I gather part of the reason of the experiment is to show the sponge like appearance and dispel the misconseption of the lungs being hollow.
     
  14. don't forget to have some alternative work available for those children who choose not to take part in the dissection
     
  15. Re post 9 We do do lung dissection on our PGCE - perhaps you opted for the wrong one ;-)
     
  16. My favourite lesson of the whole damn year!!! The kids love it and even the most easily distracted, easily tempted into disruption are well into it!
     
  17. Just wondered if anyone had some instuctions (or a video) showing steps to take during dissection?
    I'm due to demo it on Wed with year 9 but lungs have only come out of freezer today so don't think I'll get a chance to have a practice with them as I'm being observed teaching 3 times tomorrow....
    I understand the structure of the lungs & I have no problem with doing a dissection, but have never dissected a lung (& dissection did not really feature heavily during my school days sadly) & wanted some advice/instructions.
     
  18. wow - how strange to read a post I did years ago... oh those fresh faced PGCE days... anyway I reckon over the years I have now worked myself up a nice routine on this one... feel free to follow or adapt.
    1. Position kids on stools around central bench. Not TOO close. No standing.
    2. Make joke about current dissection victim not handing in homework on time, give knowing look to similar offenders.
    3. Fess up that it's from a sheep really but how it's very similar to our own.
    4. Hold up and point out the obvious parts.
    5. Discuss oesophagus/windpipe (adjust language to level of class). Cut cartilage out & discuss. Cut along oesophagus, show the inside. Can discuss cells if you wish.
    6. Continue to cut down to bronchi, bronchioles i.e. follow the tubes along as far as poss on one side. Stop and poke quite a bit as you do this. Note pinkness etc. - sheep probably a non-smoker.
    7. Attempt inflation. Use a fairly small diameter rubber tube and a pump.
    8. Chop a bit of lung off and put in plastic bag to hand round. Keep your eye on it.
    9. Mention haggis.

    I also usually have a bell jar with diagphragm and balloon to represent an alveoli, can go onto discuss how lungs inflate, then label diagrams etc.

    HTH!
     
  19. oops... an alveolus
     
  20. I guess the OP has a typo and means 'trachea' not 'oesophagus' [​IMG]
    I always do lung dissection. Inflating the lungs allows a good demonstration of the elastic tissue around the alveoli "stretch and recoil" during inspiration/expiration.
    Sometimes you also get the larynx and if you are lucky you might be able to get a "baaaaa"

     

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