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Lowering of standards of spoken English at the B.B.C.

Discussion in 'Primary' started by billysiv, Jan 29, 2011.


  1. Am I alone or does anyone else find the lowering of standards of spoken English at the BBC deplorable. I recently wrote complaining that Messrs Hansen and Lawrenson (those well known Match of the Day pundits) were using the phrase “ a stonewall penalty” in the wrong way.Imagine my surprise to receive return mail quoted below.

    Dear Mr S.......

    Reference CAS-544251

    Thanks for contacting us regarding BBC One's 'Match of the Day'.

    I understand that you're unhappy with how Alan Hansen and Mark Lawrenson refer to situations as 'stone wall' as you find this to be incorrect.

    This term is incorrect as you have pointed out but over the years it has found relevance in the footballing world to describe a certain penalty for instance. Mark and Alan have played in and viewed many games over their lives and this is now an accepted phrase in football punditry. I'm sorry for any offence this may have caused.

    We’re guided by the feedback that we receive and to that end I'd like to assure you that I've registered your complaint on our audience log. This is a daily report of audience feedback that's circulated to many BBC staff, including members of the BBC Executive Board, programme makers, channel controllers and other senior managers.

    The audience logs are seen as important documents that can help shape decisions about future programming and content.

    Thanks again for taking the time to contact us.

    Kind Regards

    Gareth Brennan
    BBC Complaints
    www.bbc.co.uk/complaints
    </font>
    [/i]
    [/URL]Dear Mr Brennan, What nonsense to describe this as an accepted phrase in football punditry. Accepted by whom, the illiterati?
    The only place I have ever heard it used is by these two so I doubt very much that it has found any relevance anywhere other than on Match of the Day. Is this what Hansen and Lawrenson told you or have you made this up yourself?
    Are we now to allow the &ldquo;footballing world&rdquo; to be arbiters of correct English?
    Billysiv
     

  2. Am I alone or does anyone else find the lowering of standards of spoken English at the BBC deplorable. I recently wrote complaining that Messrs Hansen and Lawrenson (those well known Match of the Day pundits) were using the phrase &ldquo; a stonewall penalty&rdquo; in the wrong way.Imagine my surprise to receive return mail quoted below.

    Dear Mr S.......

    Reference CAS-544251

    Thanks for contacting us regarding BBC One's 'Match of the Day'.

    I understand that you're unhappy with how Alan Hansen and Mark Lawrenson refer to situations as 'stone wall' as you find this to be incorrect.

    This term is incorrect as you have pointed out but over the years it has found relevance in the footballing world to describe a certain penalty for instance. Mark and Alan have played in and viewed many games over their lives and this is now an accepted phrase in football punditry. I'm sorry for any offence this may have caused.

    We&rsquo;re guided by the feedback that we receive and to that end I'd like to assure you that I've registered your complaint on our audience log. This is a daily report of audience feedback that's circulated to many BBC staff, including members of the BBC Executive Board, programme makers, channel controllers and other senior managers.

    The audience logs are seen as important documents that can help shape decisions about future programming and content.

    Thanks again for taking the time to contact us.

    Kind Regards

    Gareth Brennan
    BBC Complaints
    www.bbc.co.uk/complaints
    </font>
    [/i]
    [/URL]Dear Mr Brennan, What nonsense to describe this as an accepted phrase in football punditry. Accepted by whom, the illiterati?
    The only place I have ever heard it used is by these two so I doubt very much that it has found any relevance anywhere other than on Match of the Day. Is this what Hansen and Lawrenson told you or have you made this up yourself?
    Are we now to allow the &ldquo;footballing world&rdquo; to be arbiters of correct English?
    Billysiv
     
  3. lol [​IMG]
     
  4. Sad but now the BBC are not just turning a blind ear, or a deaf eye, but condoning and making excuses for this nonsense. What chance do our kids stand?
     

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