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low level disruption

Discussion in 'New teachers' started by mygirlisanNQT, Jan 18, 2012.

  1. I have a year 10 class who I am finding difficult to teach. They take a long time to settle into lessons and we do not get through the work I have planned to do. I find it very difficult to get them to stop talking and listen to me and we waste a lot of time in lesson's for me waiting for them to be quiet. I often end up abandoning my lesson plan as feel I can not get through it.
    There are about 4 boys who call out across the room during the lesson. Some of the other pupils in the class are becomming fed up with the lessons and feel they are not learning as much as they should be. I do not believe they expect to learn when they come to my classroom and think that a disruptive lesson is now the norm. I do write names on board and give detentions but when I do that half the time they do not turn up.
    Could I please have some guidance/ advice on how to deal with lots of low level disruption which is stoppping the class from being able to progress properly. How can I get the students to listen to me. Thanks in advance to anyone who replies to this
     
  2. I have a year 10 class who I am finding difficult to teach. They take a long time to settle into lessons and we do not get through the work I have planned to do. I find it very difficult to get them to stop talking and listen to me and we waste a lot of time in lesson's for me waiting for them to be quiet. I often end up abandoning my lesson plan as feel I can not get through it.
    There are about 4 boys who call out across the room during the lesson. Some of the other pupils in the class are becomming fed up with the lessons and feel they are not learning as much as they should be. I do not believe they expect to learn when they come to my classroom and think that a disruptive lesson is now the norm. I do write names on board and give detentions but when I do that half the time they do not turn up.
    Could I please have some guidance/ advice on how to deal with lots of low level disruption which is stoppping the class from being able to progress properly. How can I get the students to listen to me. Thanks in advance to anyone who replies to this
     
  3. GloriaSunshine

    GloriaSunshine New commenter

    It is difficult to regain control when you lose the good kids, so you're right to think that you must act now. I would start with a seating plan if you don't have one, or it's not working. If nothing else, it will reinforce your authority. Plan some boring lessons where all students can achieve and learn. If your lesson ends at break time, keep back those who have not finished. Pay lots of attention to those who try. Never give a detention unless you are going to follow it up. If a child defies you and doesn't turn up, there should be consequences. Check the department and school behaviour policy. Talk to your head of department. If nothing else happens, phone parents and use after school detentions. Catch the main offenders and crack them first, because it sends a message out. Catch children being good and be nice to them. In other words, send out the message to the 'sheep' who could go one way or the other, that they're better off doing the work set. If the class won't listen to you, they'll need training. Give them something to do as soon as they come in and explain the next activity. Keep explanations short and have worksheets or book work where they don't need long explanations. Make it worthwhile so the good kids can work through the activities and learn. Be bright and cheerful with kids when talking to them as individuals - it's so easy to become really negative with classes like these. Good luck - it's really hard turning classes round but worth it.
     

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