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Lost Property at Airports

Discussion in 'Personal' started by ilovesooty, May 2, 2012.

  1. ilovesooty

    ilovesooty Lead commenter

    Would anyone else have found this a bit strange?
    I flew home from Schipol Airport yesterday. When I popped into the toilets before my flight I found a ladies' watch on the floor. It was quite an expensive one, I think - a Rotary. It wasn't damaged and the clasp had seemingly come loose. I waited about five minutes in case the owner came dashing back, but to no avail.
    I then spoke to a member of staff and he told me to take it to the airport information desk. I walked there - it's a big airport - and the woman on the counter simply held out her hand for it. I asked whether she was going to take my details and she shrugged and said "Why would I?" I explained that perhaps the watch's owner might like to let me know they'd got it back safely, and she just said "It doesn't work like that here." I insisted on leaving them anyway. If I'd lost an item like that I'd be keen to let the finder know I'd been reunited with it.
    Oh, and apparently items which aren't claimed become the property of the airport.
    It's not that I'm expecting a reward or anything, but it seems strange to me not to take the details of the finder so that they could perhaps find out that the person got her property back safely.
     
  2. ilovesooty

    ilovesooty Lead commenter

    Would anyone else have found this a bit strange?
    I flew home from Schipol Airport yesterday. When I popped into the toilets before my flight I found a ladies' watch on the floor. It was quite an expensive one, I think - a Rotary. It wasn't damaged and the clasp had seemingly come loose. I waited about five minutes in case the owner came dashing back, but to no avail.
    I then spoke to a member of staff and he told me to take it to the airport information desk. I walked there - it's a big airport - and the woman on the counter simply held out her hand for it. I asked whether she was going to take my details and she shrugged and said "Why would I?" I explained that perhaps the watch's owner might like to let me know they'd got it back safely, and she just said "It doesn't work like that here." I insisted on leaving them anyway. If I'd lost an item like that I'd be keen to let the finder know I'd been reunited with it.
    Oh, and apparently items which aren't claimed become the property of the airport.
    It's not that I'm expecting a reward or anything, but it seems strange to me not to take the details of the finder so that they could perhaps find out that the person got her property back safely.
     
  3. Ilovetravel

    Ilovetravel New commenter

    As an extension of this they put all unclaimed stuff into auctions for the general public to buy. I've been and bought loads of stuff from these. You'd be surprised what people leave behind! I can't decide whether people are so rich they couldn't be bothered to find their case or the airlines are so **** at reuniting them? Probably the latter.

    In response you your post, thousands of items are left every week. I doubt they have the time or inclination to record the finder.
     
  4. ilovesooty

    ilovesooty Lead commenter

    Yes, I imagine thousands of items are left. I suppose I was a bit bemused as she wasn't busy, the counter was deserted, she seemed annoyed to be dragged away from checking Facebook, and she seemed to think that I was strange for asking!
     
  5. I suspect also, it is because of the number of items handed in.
    On a tangent, when I flew back to Germany at Christmas, my hand luggage was damaged as it was going through the security check, so I immediately asked for somebody to take a look at it (so that they couldn't say it had happened elsewhere) and also took photos (it was so badly damaged that it was beyond repair and everything falling out - God knows what they did to it).
    I asked for a claims form. They didn't have one! (not as in not currently available, they do not have such a thing at all, apparently). So I asked how to make a claim. They took a post-it, asked me for my name and then said I should contact them via the website. When I asked what the point of the post-it was, if I had to contact them, I was met with a shrug of shoulders.
    It really annoyed me. Perhaps pernickty of me, but I am used to a different way of dealing with things (and the airport also wasn't busy at the time).

     
  6. dumpty

    dumpty Lead commenter

    I think this is also the lack of trust (understandable) the British have in authority. In this situation I would not have handed the watch over as I am not getting any firm evidence the worker will not pocket it his or her self. There has to be some sort of registration or receipt and this works best for all parties - if the man or lady comes back and get the watch back, the first thing they would want to do is thank the person who handed it in. A receipt/record also confirms the item has been handed in and is on file.
     
  7. seza-lou

    seza-lou New commenter

    I accidently left my kindle on the plane when I was at Luton airport (believe me I was absolutly kicking myself but that is what you get for gossiping with a fellow passenger!) I took me over an hour of phone calls going back and forth to get to the right department where lost and found is and then I got told that I had to call back 3 working days later, kept on getting told different information, but I eventually did get my kindle back.
    Although a funny aside when I turned it on it was on the registration page and it looked like somebody had tried to de-register the kindle from my name, I don't know why they had stopped but it was not a page you could easily get to!
     

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