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Lost in my head

Discussion in 'Health and wellbeing' started by yapyap, Jan 26, 2011.

  1. Sorry - his is a splurge. I don't know what I want anyone to say. I've been o n citalopram for a while now, after 2 months the dose got doubled, as it seemed I was only getting worse (am pretty high up on depression scale) and now I don't know what to do. I don't think I'm either more or less depressed, but I am so tired and stupid. This was mostly the problem in the first place, I can live with most of the rest of it, have been for years, but you can't teach and be vacant. Have another appt in two and a half weeks, but I don't know if I should try to go back before then. I just feel I'm whining all the time. I don't know. Sorry.
     
  2. Sorry - his is a splurge. I don't know what I want anyone to say. I've been o n citalopram for a while now, after 2 months the dose got doubled, as it seemed I was only getting worse (am pretty high up on depression scale) and now I don't know what to do. I don't think I'm either more or less depressed, but I am so tired and stupid. This was mostly the problem in the first place, I can live with most of the rest of it, have been for years, but you can't teach and be vacant. Have another appt in two and a half weeks, but I don't know if I should try to go back before then. I just feel I'm whining all the time. I don't know. Sorry.
     
  3. Hi, I have been on citilopram for PND. I know the vacant feeling and feeling like your whinging. I don't really know alot about depression but I can understand how you feel (I got so bad I thought about driving into a lamp post). I have felt so tired for ages and I don't know why because I sleep so much. I find myself sitting just stirring at things, not even enough energy to think about things.
    I think you should not go back unless you truely feel up to it. Also talking on here really does help, I have done lots of it. There are a lot of people who feel them same out there. So talk away!
    Take care
    Hugs
    GEO
     
  4. Thanks Geo - that was a lovely post, and I hope you are feeling better now. I am still working at the moment, and considering going back to the doctors, because I'm really not convinced I should be in this state! Equally though, I don't want to become a moany person, or an off sick forever person (and I can't afford it!) but I do worry that I am dangerously not on the ball. Oh dear.
     
  5. Hi Yapyap,
    Depression's not a good place to be. When it got me a few years ago, I ignored it and continued to work although I don't think I should have. Untreated depression left me with Panic Discorder and Agorpahobia for which I was treated with Citalopram. I started on 20mg and eventually ended up on 40mg. I am back down to 20 now as part of the weaning off process.
    Foe the most part, I don't think Citalopram had any negative effects on me. It improved my thinking and took the edge off the panic. There obviously IS a link with the tiredness and foggy thinking though, as it was the first thing my GP suggested when I went to him complaining of this a dew months ago. It turns out for me that an underactive thyroid has caused my extreme fatigue, but I thought it might be useful for you to know my GP's initial reaction.
    If you are feeling numb, or generally worried about any adverse symptoms of the medication then I would personally suggest an earlier visit to your GP. Your dosage may not be right and might warrant further regulation.
    I really hope things start to look up for you, there are many on these forums who have personal experience of depression and have always been a tower of strength and good advice to me. Be kind to yourself, and if you don't feel up to work, take time off. You're not a moaner, you're ill and need to give yourself a break and accept that you need time to nurse yourself back to health.
     
  6. Hi again yapyap,
    There is one thing I have learned about the teaching profession. If you talking to long serving teachers (not the ones who have been promoted up away from the chalkface) most of them have had a period when they had an amount of time off to recover from something.
    I think we are to quick to hide our feelings for the sake of the 1500 pupils we look after. This does get the better of you some times and you have to stop and think about you for a while. Remember you are ill, you are not whinging and you will not get better if you do not accept this. Part of this illness is the feeling of guilt and always feeling like you are in the wrong. You will grow from this as a stronger person.
    There are people at school who are like robots, generally they have lots of supportive family to pick up the pieces for them.Usually on a reduced timetable and the ablity to close their office door when they need to. Sorry maybe that's a bit bitchy!
    Forget for the time what other people think and look after yourself. One period how ever long it maybe is better than bits and bats of days and a rundown teacher. It's better for the kids.
    It's time to think about you.
    GEO
     

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