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Loss of pay for strike. How much?

Discussion in 'Mathematics' started by lizlucy, Jul 15, 2011.

  1. lizlucy

    lizlucy New commenter

    I am a part time teacher (0.8fte) and have just received my pay slip to find that I have been deducted the same amount as a full time teacher.
    My union guidelines said
    "For teachers covered by the Burgundy Book
    Deductions from salary for members in maintained schools will be made in line with Section 3, paragraph 3.2 of the Conditions of Service for School Teachers in England and Wales (the 'Burgundy Book'). This specifies a deduction of 1/365 for unpaid leave of absence. Part-time teachers who take strike action will have a salary deduction calculation based on their normal contractual hours for the day of action."
    On the day of the strike I should have attended for a full days teaching but I still think that I should only be deducted 0.8 of a full time teachers salary.
    Are there any other part timers out there who can clarify what their schools did?
     
  2. So, let's get this right...
    .. you are bleating about 0.2 of a day's pay....
    .. as against untold thousands potentially lost in future.
    Looking at the bigger picture, it's a small price to pay, don't you think? [​IMG]
    Part-time teachers who take strike action will have a salary deduction calculation based on their normal contractual hours for the day of action.
    On the day of the strike I should have attended for a full days teaching
    Ergo - full day's deduction!
     
  3. Maths_Mike

    Maths_Mike New commenter

    It seems to me you have answered your own question
     
  4. lizlucy

    lizlucy New commenter

    So full time teachers are deducted 1/365=0.00273... of their salary but I am deducted a greater fraction of my pay and you consider that fair.
    If I had worked the school would have paid me £80.56 before deductions but they have deducted £100.70 before deductions.
    I know it is small amounts compared to what we will lose but I was trying to find out how other part time teachers had had deductions made.
    I believe the strike action was important and I will strike again if asked to but I don't see why the school should profit from my strike action - even by a tiny amount.
     
  5. DM

    DM New commenter

    One of my colleagues went on strike on her day off and didn't lose any pay. Perhaps the next strike will fall on your day off?
     
  6. lizlucy

    lizlucy New commenter

    I don't have a day off but I do think that from the definition of strike she didn't technically strike as she would not have been working that day anyway.
     
  7. Maths_Mike

    Maths_Mike New commenter

    It does not matter what you (or I) think is fair. Rules is rules.
     
  8. Maths_Mike

    Maths_Mike New commenter

    And thinking about it it is fair. A teacher did not attend for 1/365 of their contracted hours.
    You did not attend for a larger fraction of the hours for which you are paid.
     
  9. coyote

    coyote New commenter

    1/195, surely?
     
  10. lizlucy

    lizlucy New commenter

    The problem is the "Burgundy book" states 1/365 but doesn't say what this a fraction of. I assumed (wrongly it would appear from the other comments on this thread) that it was 1/365 of my annual salary.
    My original post was worded badly. I am asking any part time teachers out there whether they were deducted 1/365 of their actual annual salary or 1/365 of the full time salary equivalent to their position on the pay scale?
     
  11. DM

    DM New commenter

    You provided the quotation that is absolutely clear lizlucy:
    "Part-time teachers who take strike action will have a salary deduction calculation <u>based on their normal contractual hours for the day of action</u>."
    You said you had a full teaching day on the strike day so it is absolutely correct that you should have lost a full day's pay. Every other teacher in the same position will have been treated identically.
     
  12. lizlucy

    lizlucy New commenter

    Scilab - many thanks for your support. My rep is seeking clarification from the union. The problem arises because it doesn't say 1/365 of your annual pay it just says 1/365.
    Will post again when he gets back to me but I think I may just have to grin and bear it. Seems part timers lose out all round. When I held a temporary TLR (to cover a maternity) I only got 0.8 of it despite having to do all the work!
     
  13. pwc9000

    pwc9000 New commenter

    I nearly didn't bother posting again because I doubt you will take any notice.
    It is 1/365 of FTE then taking into account how much of the day you were due to work - as you were due to work the whole day it is 1/365 of FTE then x1.
    If you were due to work half a day then 1/365 of FTE then x0.5
    If you were not due to work at all then 1/365 of FTE then x0
    The way you are talking about wanting it calculated - just 1/365 of your annual salary - then a part-timer not due to work on the strike day would lose salary!!!
     
  14. DM

    DM New commenter

    Assuming you are paid M6 outside London, 0.2 x &pound;31552 / 365 = &pound;17.29. After pension contribution, income tax and N.I. you are quibbling about just over &pound;11.
     
  15. Anonymous

    Anonymous New commenter

    This sounds like a good functional maths question. Maths in the real world. Maybe we could link it to pension contributions as well.
     
  16. Can I just ask.......................
    Have you been to your school finance dept and asked if it has been done by error or in fact it is the correct amount in their view?
     
  17. Coyote says "1/195, surely?"
    We that's what I lost in a previous strike a few years ago - colleges don't stick to 1/365. This time more generous at 1/260!!
     
  18. I lost 1/195 in a strike a few years ago - this time it's supposedly 1/260. Colleges are less generous than schools!!
     
  19. lizlucy

    lizlucy New commenter

    So are you saying that all teachers, no matter what their annual salary, should lose the same amount?
    I interpreted the 1/365 as being 1/365 of that teachers annual salary.
     
  20. I am not a union rep or a lawyer, so I can't interpret the burgundy book for you, but it seems to be within the realms of natural justice that if you go on strike on a particular day then you lose the pay you would have earned <u>on that particular day</u>. If you were due to be paid &pound;0 on that day then you lose &pound;0. If you were due to be paid &pound;100 on that day then you lose &pound;100.
    In fact, it isn't really the case that you have "lost" that money. You didn't earn it in the first place.
    When I was 15 I had a paper round. If I hadn't turned up I wouldn't have got paid. End of story. You didn't turn up for a full day of teaching, so you haven't been paid for that full day of teaching. Seems straightforward to me.
     

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