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Looking for PMLD maths ideas and activities.

Discussion in 'Special educational needs' started by paulmarkj, Sep 8, 2008.

  1. paulmarkj

    paulmarkj New commenter

    Repost - last post went a bit corrupt - this one is a bit better.

    I am planning maths lessons for a class of 6 PMLD pupils.

    I am looking for ideas and activities for lessons on pre-counting skills and measuring.

    These pupils are around P1-P2 and have very little communication (the most able pupil has no signing and speak two words). The counting lessons will therefore be centred around tactile activities such as "Develop preferences for respond differentially to familiar objects, using different actions on them (shaking, banging, squeezing, rolling)" or ?Develop differentiating schemes to explore objects (hitting, hand transference, physical exploration, shaking, letting go)".

    Certain ideas spring to mind (eg: musical instruments) but when I think that I will need 35 lessons this term, I would like as many ideas (games, songs, anything!!!) I want the lessons to be interesting and stimulating, and I just can't think of enough ideas.

    Any pointers to good websites greatly appreciated.


     
  2. paulmarkj

    paulmarkj New commenter

    Repost - last post went a bit corrupt - this one is a bit better.

    I am planning maths lessons for a class of 6 PMLD pupils.

    I am looking for ideas and activities for lessons on pre-counting skills and measuring.

    These pupils are around P1-P2 and have very little communication (the most able pupil has no signing and speak two words). The counting lessons will therefore be centred around tactile activities such as "Develop preferences for respond differentially to familiar objects, using different actions on them (shaking, banging, squeezing, rolling)" or ?Develop differentiating schemes to explore objects (hitting, hand transference, physical exploration, shaking, letting go)".

    Certain ideas spring to mind (eg: musical instruments) but when I think that I will need 35 lessons this term, I would like as many ideas (games, songs, anything!!!) I want the lessons to be interesting and stimulating, and I just can't think of enough ideas.

    Any pointers to good websites greatly appreciated.


     
  3. DJL

    DJL

    What age are the pupils? Are you sure about their levels as being able to speak two words is probably higher than P2.
    I really wouldn't worry about trying to think of lots of different ideas. It will be much better with pupils at this level to have a few activities which are repeated regularly (every lesson could have the same structure with just a few changes each time) so that they can begin to respond over time. Your objectives sound great - I used to do similar with 'treasure baskets' and could use a different one each session, providing variety. It meant that students could work on their individual objectives (eg hand transference) but using lots of different items.
    Good websites are hard to find, but look up 'Les Staves'.

     
  4. paulmarkj

    paulmarkj New commenter

    They are 15 years old, the average is P2, but they range from P1-P3, (the 2-word pupil is rated P4in speaking, but lower in numeracy.

    At that age, the P levels really don't work, pupil can be higher in some specific areas and lower in others.

    I agree with the repetition - it seems to work and sone pupils realy respond to it - but it is difficult keeping the staff motivated and fresh

    Anyway, thanks for the reply, I will certainly read the Les Staves site - if I get any time!
     
  5. I agree with you about keeping staff motivated and whilst it is important for staff to be motivated/excited to keep pupils on task you aren't there for them and it's tough luck if they find it boring. You need to be doing repetitive stuff, and the staff need to be able to deliver that day after day after day in an "Isn't this exciting" way each time. That's the team's job. We act, the pupils respond.
     
  6. Flo Longhorn does a book on sensory maths for special people (cant remember the exact title coz Mr TJ is in bed!!) - found it quite useful for my post 16 ASC group
     
  7. DJL

    DJL

    Oh Henni, you wouldn't believe how much I go on about that myself! It's the most important thing for our students, and so hard to get other people to understand!
     
  8. DJL

    DJL

    Henni's point was obviously that staff don't need to be motivated by 'exciting' activities - it's their job to make the activities interesting for the children, even if the activity itself is something they've done a million times before. Often this is achieved through positive, warm relationships in which the students want to work with the adults. Busy, buzzy lessons in which the teacher is effectively entertaining the adults while the students are bewildered (and believe me, these happen) do not teach the students anything. Of course there's a place for 'awe and wonder' too - but not all the time.
    Henni didn't imply that she says 'tough luck' to her staff either!!
     
  9. If you work in admin, you would be doing routine and mundane things, if you were in accountancy, same as, if you worked in a supermarket, beep, beep, beep. Our Learning Support Assistants do an amazing job and most could earn more in other sectors but they choose not to because they get more from working with pupils. And they all, mostly, get satisfaction from the response from the pupils.That can be the smallest thing, a pupil tapping on the table during a song but that being a first is a HUGE thing and bring a great amount of pleasure to all involved is better than, well almost anything. I believe that in my first post I said how important staff motivation was and I stand by that, it's up to you to inspire and motivate staff.
     

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