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Little Red Hen - Bread

Discussion in 'Early Years' started by inky, Oct 13, 2011.

  1. inky

    inky Lead commenter

    There are plenty of simple bread recipes online. Print out and laminate is my advice. You'll be able to get the dough almost ready for baking in 90 mins - all the action is in the weighing, mixing and kneading, really.
    Practise at home first if you haven't made bread before. It'll be worth it.
     
  2. Hey,
    We made bread last week, I cheated and used a bread mix. After you've mixed the ingrediants, and kneaded the dough, it does take about another 30 mins or so for the yeast to work and the dough to double in size and be ready for baking.
    If it's for an observation, perhaps practice at home first, so you know what you are doing. You can also roughly time yourself...then add a bit more for doing it with the children, it always takes way longer!
    An alternative could be tasting bread from other countries? We did this too, we tasted pitta, baguette, naan, bagel and croissants and looked on a globe to see where they came from. As we were going along, we filled in a like/don't like chart (just cut and stick pics of the bread). There was lots of left over bread to use for printing later in the week.
    Have fun and good luck.
    : )
     
  3. I will be making bread next week and plan to make soda bread. It does not use yeast so you do not have to leave it to rise.
    I may use this recipe-
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/food/recipes/irishsodabread_67445
    In the past I have weighed out the ingredients then converted them into cups or large spoons- then re -wrote my recipe with pictures so the children could access it easily.

    Good luck!
     
  4. inky

    inky Lead commenter

    But using yeast is wonderful! You hae to wake it up by making it warm and giving it something to eat and drink - never was the magic of science better illustrated for little children!
    Please don't cheat. The yeast part is brilliant and doesn't equire that much more effort.
     
  5. I agree, use yeast to get science/knowledge and understanding of the world in, good cross curricular links, not to mention the maths using non-standard measures and literacy following instructions. And definitely practice first, I'm quite good at baking, when it came to using a bread maker though my bread failed drastically, all for traditional methods!
    Good luck, hope it goes well! [​IMG]
     
  6. inky

    inky Lead commenter

    Just remember that breadmaking can cover just about every single area of the curriculum in one of the most enjoyable ways possible for the children.
     
  7. inky

    inky Lead commenter

    There's something magical about yeast, especially if you're able to get hold of the live stuff for the children to sniff at.
    I once tried making sourdough, which just uses yeast from the air, but mr inky couldn't stand the stench of the starter and made me throw it away.
     
  8. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    We often use bread dough in the malleable area and in the home corner
     
  9. 'Please don't cheat. The yeast part is brilliant and doesn't equire that much more effort.'

    Not sure the Irish see it as cheating!!!
     
  10. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    Was the little red hen Irish?
     
  11. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    I actually had a similar conversation in the staff room earlier this week about not buying pre prepared pizza bases and the joys of real dough
     
  12. Msz- I am shocked that you even consider pre prepared pizza bases are comparable to making Irish soda bread!
     
  13. inky

    inky Lead commenter

    I'd be looking to do both during the year but, let's face it, baking soda isn't quite as magical as yeast.
     
  14. Humph- I think i may be having a bit of culinary strop here.
    Soda bread is made of real dough and is a real bread- and tastes nice-- and Hugh Fearnley Whatsischops makes it so it is good enough for me.
    I am now off to Tesco to buy necessary ingredients for a pleasant week of <u>bread</u> making!
    (I may even stamp my feet and slam the door shut as I leave the house).

     
  15. Msz

    Msz Established commenter


    actually the part of the conversation that was similar was

    I usually make soda bread and Irish stew on the 17th March [​IMG]



     
  16. inky

    inky Lead commenter

    Ooh, I'm hungry...
     
  17. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    It's a long time until March ... I need a Romanian recipe for after half term [​IMG]
     
  18. inky

    inky Lead commenter

    Romanian food can be really lovely. Let's do a search.
     

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