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Literacy/numeracy assessment

Discussion in 'Special educational needs' started by allaboutclait, May 3, 2012.

  1. I wonder if anyone can help me. I work as a trainer in a company and we have a 20 year old lad with moderate cerebral palsy on work experience. I have six weeks left with him and am giving him half a day one to one tuition each week a it is obvious he is struggling with some aspects of reading and numeracy, especially reading handwriting. Does anyone have any assessments I can use with him, he hasn't said he's dyslexic (which I would have thought most lads of his age would know by now). He can walk and drive but is weak on his left side. I am wondering whether his brain damage means he is having to compensate with the 'wrong' side of his brain and that is giving him difficulties. I think he may have problems with things like working out what letter you would need to add to the start of ird to make a word. He also seemed to strugglle reading the word 'firm' today, I can see that is quite a difficult word phonetically.

    Any help or advice in techniques to use would be welcomed.
     
  2. I wonder if anyone can help me. I work as a trainer in a company and we have a 20 year old lad with moderate cerebral palsy on work experience. I have six weeks left with him and am giving him half a day one to one tuition each week a it is obvious he is struggling with some aspects of reading and numeracy, especially reading handwriting. Does anyone have any assessments I can use with him, he hasn't said he's dyslexic (which I would have thought most lads of his age would know by now). He can walk and drive but is weak on his left side. I am wondering whether his brain damage means he is having to compensate with the 'wrong' side of his brain and that is giving him difficulties. I think he may have problems with things like working out what letter you would need to add to the start of ird to make a word. He also seemed to strugglle reading the word 'firm' today, I can see that is quite a difficult word phonetically.

    Any help or advice in techniques to use would be welcomed.
     

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