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Literacy Intervention for NC Level 1 students

Discussion in 'Primary' started by shy anne, Nov 11, 2011.

  1. I work in a Secondary school and, amazingly, have some money left in my department budget and I want to buy some resources to use in small intervention groups with my SEN students - working at L1 in Literacy, with little reading skills and pretty much unable to write even single words. I do deliver Fresh Start phonics but only for two hours a week as I do not teach the classes everyday.
    I am looking for a complete programme of some kind, a bit like the LPU's (literacy progress units) which were issued to Seconday schools a number of years ago. The LPU's are set at too high a level for non readers so I was wondering what resources Primary Schools use to support at this level. I have googled for ideas but it is difficult to assess quality from a web page.
    Thanks in advance

     
  2. I work in a Secondary school and, amazingly, have some money left in my department budget and I want to buy some resources to use in small intervention groups with my SEN students - working at L1 in Literacy, with little reading skills and pretty much unable to write even single words. I do deliver Fresh Start phonics but only for two hours a week as I do not teach the classes everyday.
    I am looking for a complete programme of some kind, a bit like the LPU's (literacy progress units) which were issued to Seconday schools a number of years ago. The LPU's are set at too high a level for non readers so I was wondering what resources Primary Schools use to support at this level. I have googled for ideas but it is difficult to assess quality from a web page.
    Thanks in advance

     
  3. Read Write Inc. is a good programme but you are already using it. I would recommend the Hickey Multisensory Language Programme.
     
  4. We also have the Hickey programme used by our SpLD specialist so i thought it was only suitable for children with dyslexia? The ones I am working with are not dyslexic as such. Any thoughts on programmes that i can deliver to a small group rather than 1:1?
     
  5. Have a look at Phonics International www.phonicsinternational.com
    There is nothing about Hickey which makes it 'only suitable for children with dyslexia' but it is slow in pace and rather 'rule' bound. From what I can recall of it it spends quite a lot of time on activities which are not particularly relevant to what these children need, which is learning the letter/sound correspondences to automaticity and using their knowledge for decoding and blending words and for spelling. The essential thing about working with KS3 pupils is that you don't have much time and so have to bring them up to speed as quickly as possible. Fresh Start is excellent but it moves quite quickly and I can see that it might move on too fast for L1 pupils. I use it but none of our pupils are below L2 on entry in Y7. Phonics International can be taken at any pace and has loads of useful resources.
     
  6. legoearth

    legoearth New commenter

    RAPID,reading,writing and maths. Brilliant scheme.I've used it with y6. i brought a 'no level' reader to age 7.2 in one school year! Nice books for readers and it uses a computer programme in tandem.
     
  7. Children "with Dyslexia" (whatever that is) need exactly the same remedial work as children who "are behind in reading and writing" - a good synthetic phonics programme that teaches them the alphabetic code in a structured way and teaches them how to use that knowledge to blend letter(s)/sound correspondences to read and how to segment them to spell. The dyslexia label can be a bit of a red herring.
     
  8. If u are in a room with an IWB for at least some of the time u could spend a few minutes going back to basics with words from the learning to read page on my free website
    <font color="#0000ff">http://englishspellingproblems.co.uk/html/learning_to_read.html</font> then teach/revise the most common tricky words:
    the, he, be, we, me, she, of, to, was, want, all, call, one, said,
    you, by, my, only, come, could, do, down, into, look, now, other, right,
    some, there, two, when, what, where, which, who, your,
    are, have, before, more, were
    and get them to write short sentences.
     

  9. Letter/sound correspondence, decoding and blending for spelling is exactly what the Hickey programme teaches. It does it in a multisensory way which is useful for children who haven't learnt just by listening (predominant teaching method is talking). It is very thorough and does one sound at a time but if a child in KS3 is working at level 1 they clearly have significant gaps in their learning so it's important to start again at the beginning. I would not presume they know anything and re-teach everything from basic code onwards.
     
  10. I know just how it works, I have seen it in action. I have also seen the very bored children it was used with and the absolutely minmal progress they made between Y7 and Y9. Yes, it does use a soupcon of SP but it also teaches letter names (completely unneccesary for reading) 'sight' words and lots of timewasting things like the alphabet arc (upper case), feeling letters in bags (why!) and other non reading related activities.

    You are joking, surely? Have you never seen any good phonics teaching?
    Well taught synthetic phonics is a completely multisensory activity. I was interested to read, some time ago, in a long article about Samuel Orton (the co-developer of the Orton-Gilliongham method, on which Hickey is based)that Orton regarded the 'multi-sensory' aspects of the programme as contained in the hearing, seeing, saying and writing elements of the teaching. None of the wilder excesses of 'multi-sensory' activities which have developed since.
    (I've lost the link, otherwise I'd post it for you)

     
  11. Cool your jets Maizie! Yes, I have seen and taught good phonics lessons. You appear to be saying that activities like feeling letters in a bag (a multi-sensory activity) is a waste of time but then say that phonics should be taught in a completely multi-sensory way. I have recently read a lot about the Orton-Gillingham method as part of my PGCE so could well have read the article you mention. Am also a bit confused that you don't consider it important for children to know the names of the letters - literacy is not just about reading surely? Some words need to be taught as 'sight' words as you are unable to sound them out so not sure what point you are making about this being a waste of time. I think it's also quite important for children to know their alphabet and I think the reason it is CL (this isn't set in stone as far as I know you can use lower case letters) is because often children know what the lower case of a letter looks like but not the corresponding CL.
     
  12. If you think that phonics is taught by mostly 'teacher talk' then you haven't seen good phonics teaching.
    If you read my post carefully you will see that Samuel Orton characterised 'multi-sensory' as 'seeing, hearing, saying & doing', which is precisely how good SP is taught. Nothing about the other activities.
    Letter names are completely irrelevant to the reading process. I am surprised that you cannot see that. The only letter 'names' which are of any use are the vowel 'names' because they represent phonemes. Children, especially the 'slower to learn', or, 'easily confused' often find it very difficult to distinguish between letter names and letter/sound correspondences. Why introduce an unnecessary level of learning, and an unnecessary 'choice' (is /ar/ spelled with the letter 'r' or the grapheme 'ar'?) into the process of learning to read and spell?

    There is plenty of time for letter names and alphabetical order once the principles of letter/sound correspondence, decoding and blending for reading and segmenting for spelling are well established. I can't see the problem with capitals, they are just another way of writing a letter which can easily be incorporated into phonics teaching. They still have the same letter/sound correspondence.
    This is just so mistaken. Some words have one unusual letter/sound correspondence, the rest of the word being perfectly straightforward. All words can be decoded! You say your PGCE was recent. I am [​IMG] that you don't seem to have been given a very good grounding in the alphabetic code and the principles of synthetic phonics teaching during the course of it.
     
  13. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    The Orton-Gillingham approach in practice
    This is a multisensory approach with auditory, visual and kinaesthetic elements reinforcing each other. The Orton-Gillingham approach involves using simultaneous multisensory instruction. A dyslexic learner is taught to see the letter A, <strike>say its name</strike> and sound and write it in the air - all at the same time. The approach requires intense instruction with ample practice.
    Good phonics teaching is multi sensory but doesn't need bags of letters to feel. Far better to use the tip of a finger to "write" the letter shape on the table/carpet/non writing hand.
    Look - at the letter shape (visual)
    Hear - the sound it represents (auditory)
    Move - air write or make action if using JP (kinaesthetic )
    Touch - write it on various surfaces (Read/write)
    Do letter names actually help a child to decode or encode a word?
    Which ones?

    A capital letter represents the same sound as a lower case letter and a lower case letter has the same letter name as a capital letter so I'm afraid I don't understand your point ...
     

  14. Could you direct me to where I have actually said this please? I said most teaching is done through talking not most phonic teaching.



    Wouldn't you class feeling a letter as 'doing'? Surely it's just another multi-sensory activity - touch.

    Agreed. Again, can you find where I have said that you need to know the letter names in order to read? What I said was that I was surprised that you felt it wasn't important that children know the letter names.



    Not quite sure what you mean here. Are you proposing that for children with SEN we should not be referring to letters by name as it is confusing? What would you say then? Can you write a symbol which makes the sound /ar/?



    Yes they have the same sound but look very different. Surely, the best time to teach them is when you are teaching the name/sound of a letter and what it looks like - how to recognise and write it?

    the, said, was for example cannot be sounded out so you must teach them as sight words and it says this very clearly in the L&S document, which is based on the Hickey Programme.



    That was what the entire PGCE was! It was the specialist dyslexia course.
     

  15. Not sure why you have crossed out saying the name of the letter.

    All good activities. I am not suggesting that feeling letters is the only multi-sensory activity you should do, just one of many.

    They don't help to decode but it is useful for children to know the names of the letters when they are encoding. I have given three examples above of words you need to teach as sight words as you cannot sound them out. If you have a look in L&S there are plenty more listed - tricky words. I have also commented on the CL issue. Children need to know how to write letters in both lower case and capital. When you are teaching the basic code is the best time to teach this IMO. You should show children letters in different fonts, sizes, cursive etc. so that they understand that although it looks different it is still the same letter and makes the same sound. Tracking exercises are really useful for helping children with this.
     
  16. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    good grief!
    the - <th> schwar
    was - <w><o>< z>
    said - <s><e>< d>
    of course they can be sounded out
    Have you read Letter & Sounds? https://www.education.gov.uk/publications/eOrderingDownload/Letters%20and%20Sounds-7.pdf
    Note that some of the words that were tricky in earlier phases <u>become fully decodable</u> in Phase Five

     
  17. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    because you don't need to teach letter names to decode or encode
    the problem is the three words you gave can be sounded out
    and you teach them how to write upper and lower case letters when you teach the sound so how how is teaching capital letters related to knowing letter names?
     
  18. Interesting. You teach /ai/ as saying /e/? Thanks for the link but have my own copy of L&S which I have used and read regularly. I am talking about when you first teach these words. Don't you teach 'said' etc. before Phase 5?
     
  19. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    no I teach that the <e> sound can be written
    e as in get
    ea as in head
    ai as in said
    ie as in friend
    don't you?
     
  20. I understand where you are coming from Msz, but I honestly don't think to continue going backwards and forwards on it is making it any clearer!
    We use the FFT literacy intervention at my school for our L1s, but unfortunately it does need a TA to be trained and implement it. It has good results though. We also use rapid reading and rapid writing which the KS2 teachers feel gives good progress.

     

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