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Literacy across the curriculum

Discussion in 'English' started by mashabell, Feb 4, 2009.

  1. <font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">When people talk about ?poor literacy? they tend to mean mainly ?poor spelling?. </font></font>


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  2. I'm sorry but that isn't the case. Spelling is part of the issue, but actually quite a minor aspect of a much wider issue.

    If the original poster would like me to send them the resources and outline the actrivities I have produced for LAC in my scholl, then please contact me directly.
     


  3. What's your email address meera1701?

    I delivered an inset on literacy across the curriculum focussing on using table mats to raise achievement. I'll send it to you if you like?


     
  4. Could I have a copy of the table mat thingy too? I have some stuff to share if anyone wants it.

    joe5krish@aol.com
     
  5. Hi, thanks yazebee. That would be very helpful. My email is: meera1701@yahoo.co.uk



    And dastari how do I contact you? Thanks and am sure your resources would be of great help to me.
     
  6. In scotland with the advent of curriculum for excellence literacy is deemed the responsibilty of every teacher. I am a literacy development officer seconded from my post as an english teacher and have been looking at literacy from 3-18 for the last 3 years. I would be happy to send ideas. I conducted an audit of literacy with local secondary schools to establish where their needs were. You could adapt it for colleagues in departments to look at. If you give me your email, I will send it on and any other stuff that you might be interested in. Use of co-op learning methods in literacy, writing across the curriculum, talking and listening etc
     
  7. Thanks falkirklit. That would be really helpful. Looking forward to all these so that I can plan during the weekend.

    meera1701@yahoo.co.uk
     
  8. tica

    tica New commenter

    I'm also a Falkirk bairn but currently working overseas. I would be really grateful, falkirklit, if you could send me your literacy audit stuff as I have just been given responsibility for LAC.I hope it's not too much to ask.

    Many thanks

    andy_nipper007@hotmail.com
     
  9. Thanks to those who were kind to reply and especially for mailing me some useful resources.
     
  10. Masha - I don't think that LAC implies spelling issues at all. I tend to find it is more to do with reading and the ability to write accurately. Spelling is only a tiny part of it and, in my experience, nowhere near the most important.
    Falkirklit - I'm sorry to do the whole bandwagon jumping thing but would you mind possibly sending me that info and resources as well? I'd really appreciate it. Many thanks.

    scatty_bird1@hotmail.com
     
  11. Thank you very much again for all the help. Would anyone have a LAC policy that I can look at? It might be a good place to start planning my presentation from. Thanks.

    meera1701@yahoo.co.uk
     
  12. Falkirklit - would you mind possibly sending me that info and resources as well? Thanks

    josephsaint@live.co.uk
     
  13. pomunder

    pomunder New commenter

    Falkirklit - you may be about to save my bacon. I started a thread on LAC audits a few weeks ago, but no response.
    I'd be very grateful if you would share your audit with me. parsnip2@mac.com
     
  14. Hi Falkirklit,

    Would you also be able to share your audit with me?



    My e-mail is: ceri_a@yahoo.co.uk Thank-you!!!
     
  15. The free resources at www.schoolwork.bz are ideal for the target group you describe. They have the advantage that pupils can access them from home online so that assigning literacy homework to children with very significant literacy deficits is straightforward.
    Hope this helps.
     
  16. Maresa Brand

    Maresa Brand New commenter

    falkirklit, may I also have a copy of those resources, and can anyone send me the tablemat thing? maresabrand@hotmail.co.uk Sorry I don't have much that I can swap except the old style Literacy Progress Units which do have some useful ideas and materials, if anyone wants those then email me directly.
     
  17. Hi Yazebe
    I'm just starting with Literacy AC - and I'd really appreciate a copy of your mats.

    anarchy@megapei.com
     
  18. Literacy accross the curriculum is only successful if you can get all subject teachers to see it is their responsibilty as well as yours. Keep Literacy high profile in your school by sending out a bulletin each half term with hints and tips. Introduce a Literacy lesson weekly into schemes of work. The 'Progress Units' are very useful for anyone unfamiliar with teaching Literacy. Produce a VCOP (vocabulary, punctuation, openings and punctuation) mat for use in all classrooms, pupils refer to the mat when doing any extended pieces of writing. (I have made one if you are interested) Use literacy games, starters in classrooms (on line, BBC skillswise-free, and Education City-subscribe, are both V good for low ability). Model for the staff an example of teaching literacy in a different subject for example using connectives in writing up a science report-get a collague to help you. Marking for literacy in all subject areas should be a school policy, raising achievement in English/literacy will raise attainment in all areas of school. All of the above could be referred to in your Power Point. A good exercise at a training day to illustrate the point that pupils don't always know/understand what to do/what is good (literacy in this case) is to give staff a piece of paper and simply tell them to write a Shakespearean Sonnet. Wait 2 minutes an 99% of the staff will be stuck! Show them that this is what happens when history or science or art teachers tell them to write about something and use, lets say, good vocabulary. The pupils will not have aclue unless it is modelled. If necessary go right back to basics and start with the alphabet and phonics. Teach pupils to read and write. Hope this helps.
     
  19. paul_brown72

    paul_brown72 New commenter

    Hi yazebee,
    Sorry to ask too, but I was thinking of doing something similiar with the placemats.
    Could I possibly have a copy?
    paul_brown72@hotmail.com
    Thanks
    Paul
     
  20. One of the best ways of 'modelling' good standards of literacy was the now obselete practice of 'dictation' which was once a routine feature of Year 7 English classes in Scottish schools and this impacted positively on all written work in subsequent years. The downside of dictation is that the teacher could only dictate at one pace which made it OK for the average, distressing for the slower and boring for the quickest.
    My research pieces dessigned were designed for SEN pupils but they are being used by some English teachers with the first term of Year 7 low ability sets. The General Literacy Skills Booster course at www.schoolwork.bz dictates at a pace determined by each individual pupil and because it is free and online, it is emminently suitable for homework assignments. The dictation exercises can be completed by any child no matter how severe their literacy deficits or how poor their literacy standards.
    Hope this helps.

     

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