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Listening v. reading GCSE

Discussion in 'Modern foreign languages' started by fionarh, Apr 3, 2012.

  1. fionarh

    fionarh New commenter

    Notice a large discrepancy between results in listening and reading at GCSE - both external results and internal assessments. Obviously, there is only one chance to get it right with listening but I suspect it's also due to time restrictions in lessons.
    Any ideas on how to address this - especially trying to fit in F and H level listening in a mixed-ability class. Does anyone set listening exerises for homework?
    Thanks
     
  2. fionarh

    fionarh New commenter

    Notice a large discrepancy between results in listening and reading at GCSE - both external results and internal assessments. Obviously, there is only one chance to get it right with listening but I suspect it's also due to time restrictions in lessons.
    Any ideas on how to address this - especially trying to fit in F and H level listening in a mixed-ability class. Does anyone set listening exerises for homework?
    Thanks
     
  3. noemie

    noemie Occasional commenter

    I did differentiated exercises with one difficult group a few years ago (Italian so probably not useful to you). I had the same listening track, with one side of the worksheet having higher type questions, and the other foundation type questions. Pupils could therefore choose the level of difficulty themselves. It sounds quite time intensive but even if you only do it once a week it should only take you about 20 minutes at most to make, and then you can share with the rest of the department. If you have mixed ability in the same class it's quite useful.
    I also used to teach a German class where a few girls were doing the higher, so I'd send them to an empty classroom with a CD and the markscheme whilst I completed the foundation with the others.
    Nowadays I download all past papers, including mark schemes and mp3 files, on the school network and get the kids to copy it on their usb sticks, then complete as homework (including marking). It relies on pupils to be self-motivated though, so I don't use this entirely as their only listening practice, but it does save lesson time.
    What I find most difficult is to get pupils to learn from their mistakes. Generally all they're interested in is the grade or score, not in recording what they did wrong. I have to dictate to them what to write down for each question if they did something wrong (e.g. if you got this question wrong write in your revision list "jamais = never" or something like that).
     
  4. LadyPsyche

    LadyPsyche New commenter

    ...I should have also have mentioned that the podcasts we use are set up as GCSE practice, and are colour coded for Foundation / Overlapping / Higher levels. My pupils tend to work through all three on any given topic, as it helps refresh their vocab before trying the harder ones. They are very short questions - about 30 seconds each. We do practice papers in the rare lessons leading up to the exam, but as noemie said, they are more interested in their grade than the vocabulary/structure required to gain the marks.
     

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