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listening tests

Discussion in 'Music' started by floyd1985, Dec 6, 2011.

  1. hello
    started at my school in september and kids have not done any type of listening activities before and obviously part of OCR gcse is the listening exam. obviously not devoting my time to it, but i'm finding it hard to get them motivated with listening and answering questions on it. are there any techniques that other people use which engage them a little bit more???
    it's also a massive class (Actually been told by OCR that my class is too big but obviously other departments are very much out for themselves and won't take anymore kids on in their classes, so i have 20% more kids than anyone else!!!! what a nice welcome!!!) there's room for 22 and there's 27 in class. practical is very hard with 2 practice rooms (more rooms than others i'm sure but still not practical) so any ideas on that would be great too
    thanks :)
    struggler xxx
     
  2. hello
    started at my school in september and kids have not done any type of listening activities before and obviously part of OCR gcse is the listening exam. obviously not devoting my time to it, but i'm finding it hard to get them motivated with listening and answering questions on it. are there any techniques that other people use which engage them a little bit more???
    it's also a massive class (Actually been told by OCR that my class is too big but obviously other departments are very much out for themselves and won't take anymore kids on in their classes, so i have 20% more kids than anyone else!!!! what a nice welcome!!!) there's room for 22 and there's 27 in class. practical is very hard with 2 practice rooms (more rooms than others i'm sure but still not practical) so any ideas on that would be great too
    thanks :)
    struggler xxx
     
  3. v12

    v12

    Place a couple of CD players with headphones at the back of the classroom - or in the corridor - or in a practice room - or in your office - and have a track of the week.
    You provide each GCSE pupil with a Listening Log - and when they listen to it, they make appropriate comments on their log. You could even get them to fill in specific details such as Composer, era, date, instrumentation, time sig, key - anything really.
    You could easily cycle through a class during the course of a lesson or two - it will become automatic after a while.
    Make the tracks different. Have pop one week, baroque another, have avant-garde one week, heavy metal another and so forth.
    Have stuff you know that they will like and stuff you know they will find awkward to listen to.
    Classic CD magazine tracks used to be brill for this exercise - as they weren't too long.
    Tried this years ago with four CD players in my office.
    Well, we were inspected one year - and because the children had got used to this system of going out for a couple of minutes each lesson and then tapping the next pupil on the shoulder when they returned - the inspector couldn't believe it. Thought it was the best thing he had ever seen in a music department (in the days when HoDs got real feedback)!!
    By the way - that was in a state school with large classes.

     
  4. Red wine fan

    Red wine fan New commenter

    Goodness me, OCR would really get their underwear in a tizz in our school. Our current GCSE group numbers 28 [​IMG] and the first year GCSE group is 23.
    The advice above is excellent but you might be better to start with AoS 3 or 4 [OCR] because you can then link the listening closely to subject knowledge about the different dance forms or descriptions. Once the pupils get more confident, you could then tackle more general listening.
     
  5. trelassick

    trelassick New commenter

    Go RWF!
     
  6. I start listening off with some unrelated music - I use tubular bells (because they might have heard it) and I also use some Gregorian Chant - you get ostinato, polyphonic, minimalism, texture, layering, a capella, monophonic - a whole loead of easy stuff - because it is not syllabus stuff it is un threatening. I teach edexcel where we have the 12 set works.
    I have 7 and 12 in my two GCSE years. But in my last school I had a class of 25 and it is murder. especially with limited practice space.
    When it comes to getting round them to do the performances it is a mamoth task - how many hours per week do you get?
     
  7. thanks all for your feedback :)
    im teaching OCR for first time too, so i'm still gettin to grips with all the different things that need to be done. im the only music teacher too, so i'm struggling a little bit with teaching 27 especially as it's a new syllabus
    anyway enough boringness, you've really helped me. has anyone else got any schemes of work that they follow for this spec - i'd just be interested in seeing what works for other people.
    AND ONE MORE THING... just had my finance department get in touch with OCR about the downloading listening tests from Itunes and there's no other way around getting the music - our school aren't a credit card school so can't pay for it through school and obviously i'm not going to dip into my own pocket to buy something for school (or is this the norm nowadays?!!?!?) is there anywhere i can get these for free?!!? youtube very slow at school when ive done listening from there before and would like something abit more reliable :)
    hope you can help
    thanks :)

    ooh by the way, i have a double lesson once a week (2 hours pw) but i'd prefer two separate hourly lessons really
     
  8. TrueFaith

    TrueFaith New commenter

    If YouTube is proving slow, try using Grooveshark - the sound quality is usually quite a lot better.

    When I used to do Edexcel (old spec mind..) I would use all manner of different CDs, as well as those from past papers to do listening practice. Would that not work for you, rather than just getting the expensive OCR anthologies?
     
  9. Red wine fan

    Red wine fan New commenter

    Behave!
    To the you OP, you don't need to download from iTunes. On the OCR Music GCSE page, click View all Documents. On there, you should find the listening examples in MP3 format for free. Admittedly, I couldn't get them downloaded because of password restrictions but my very helpful IT person did them really quickly.
    If you mean the examples for the Rhinegold questions, then yes, I think you have to download them, but there should be some exemplar & specimen questions to get you going.
    One question type my lot particularly like is on the specimen paper. I think it's question 2, but I can't remember and don't have it to hand. It plays a piece entitled something like "The Factory" and asks what you can hear in the music to fit the title. The question guides the students by asking them to refer to things like texture, instruments, tempo, dynamics etc. You could produce a grid with boxes for each of these headings and a couple of words of appropriate vocabulary as a starter and work through it as a group. Once they get the hang of these, you can write your own - the Nutcracker Suite is brilliant for AoS4 examples. HTH
     

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