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Listening/recording equipment

Discussion in 'Modern foreign languages' started by speccyteacher, Dec 7, 2011.

  1. speccyteacher

    speccyteacher New commenter

    Theoretical question for you...
    ...if you had a bottomless pit of money and needed to get some listening/recording equipment for some MFL teachers then what would you get?
    I was thinking something along the lines of a bucket load of ipod touches with headphones - but then how would oyu get them to be accessing the listening stuff you wanted them to?
    Specs
    x
     
  2. speccyteacher

    speccyteacher New commenter

    Theoretical question for you...
    ...if you had a bottomless pit of money and needed to get some listening/recording equipment for some MFL teachers then what would you get?
    I was thinking something along the lines of a bucket load of ipod touches with headphones - but then how would oyu get them to be accessing the listening stuff you wanted them to?
    Specs
    x
     
  3. First of all, you need to have a clear idea of how you are going to use the listening/recording equipment. Do you want everybody (teachers and students) to be able to use it on the move? Or do you want to use it in class or in a lab? There are many small, portable recorders (e.g. produced by Olympus) that enable good quality recordings to be made that can then be uploaded to laptop or desktop computers and edited with Audacity. Or you can use Audacity to make recordings directly onto a laptop or desktop computer - which can then be downloaded to portable devices.
    Regards
    Graham Davies
     
  4. speccyteacher

    speccyteacher New commenter

    Thanks Graham
    My wife uses one in her classroom - similar to an olympus thing. Records onto a hard drive and then you can use it on a computer etc.
    I was just wondering if there was something that MFL classroom had developed similar to the coomber system but more modern?
     
  5. Hi
    I would agree about Audacity. It works on PCs, MAC, Linux and and.....
    I also find the grahical waveform display of the recordings helpful for pronouncing morphemes, particularly in German where words can be suffocatingly long!!!
    Plus the mp3 conversion utility is great for making your own 'podcasts'. Also great for preparing sound snippets with e-learning apps and has useful tools for cleaning up the recordings or adding echo etc. Wouldn't be without it.
    http://audacity.sourceforge.net/
    Regards
     
  6. dalej

    dalej New commenter

    I would go for iPod Touches or iPads plus a secure wifi network (if you had an unlimited budget) as not only can you listen and record audio with them, there are a myriad of other things you can do. This link should give you some ideas: http://mfledapps.posterous.com
    Best wishes
    Joe

     
  7. dalej

    dalej New commenter

    You could download the free iTalk app on each device and install the iTalk Sync program on your laptop so pupils can drag them wirelessly across. As they produce AIFF files, these could be edited in Audacity or you could edit on the device itself using the Hokusai app (free) or GarageBand. See link for further advice on using iPod Touches in the MFL classroom.
    http://joedale.typepad.com/integrating_ict_into_the_/2011/07/ipod-touch-training-in-mfl.html
    Have a look too at this presentation on QR codes which can be used to launch mp3 files by scanning with each device.
    http://www.slideshare.net/joedale/exploring-the-educational-potential-of-qr-codes
    Best wishes
    Joe

     
  8. derekdalek

    derekdalek New commenter

    We use these to record speaking presentations as they are easy to use for an IT - challenged person like me and they are relatively inexpensive:
    http://www.tts-group.co.uk/shops/tts/Products/PD1727034/Easi-Speak-MP3-Recorder-Player/?rguid=dddae272-d0e6-44e9-ac84-cc6927cbda4c

    I also use cheapish mp3 players and headphone splitters for groups of students to listen to and work through foundation or higher listening papers:
    http://www.amazon.co.uk/s/?ie=UTF8&keywords=belkin+headphone+splitters&tag=googhydr-21&index=aps&hvadid=15928373508&ref=pd_sl_7ycjw1o2az_e
    I have large mixed ability KS4 groups and as its very hard to book an IT room in my school I had to think of an way round it. A larger capacity USB hub is a good idea too as it saves some time when putting the mp3 clips on to the players.
    This one has 13 ports and works well:
    http://www.amazon.co.uk/Max-Value-USB-2-0-Port/dp/B003AQCZ5Y/ref=sr_1_6?ie=UTF8&qid=1323518056&sr=8-6

    Hope this info is of use to someone!
     

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