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Life after teaching?

Discussion in 'Personal' started by dancing daisy, Mar 20, 2009.

  1. Hi All
    I decided a while ago after much consideration that I am going to leave teaching and try something different. I had been teaching for a few years, and up until recently I l but only ever worked part time due to a lack of full time posts.
    Because I only worked part time I never really got to earn a high amount of salary, which was another factor in my decision to leave the profession. I know it is not the best time to be trying to swap careers, but I feel I need to make the move now and try and get a full time post in something other than teaching. I would still like to work in education or perhaps something completely different. I am sure there are plenty of teachers on here who have changed careers and just wanted to hear whether you were happier for doing so?
    Thanks for listening
    Dancing Daisy [​IMG]
     
  2. Aargh, it posted before i had finished typing!!
    Hi All
    I decided a while ago after much consideration that I am going to leave teaching and try something different. I had been teaching for a few years,but only ever worked part time due to a lack of full time posts.
    Because I only worked part time I never really got to earn a high amount of salary, which was another factor in my decision to leave the profession. I know it is not the best time to be trying to swap careers, but I feel I need to make the move now and try and get a full time post in something other than teaching. I would still like to work in education or perhaps something completely different. I am sure there are plenty of teachers on here who have changed careers and just wanted to hear whether you were happier for doing so?
    Thanks for listening
    Dancing Daisy [​IMG]
     
  3. I'm still in education but not in the classroom. I have never regretted it, but I was late into teaching (about 12 years ago) and it was a major career change then too. I miss the classroom sometimes (but not that often) I certainly don't miss all the **** that goes with mainstream like SLT/SMT usually populated by incompetent toss pots etc...
     
  4. I am glad to hear it worked out for you Fire Girl, I am just in the process of applying for a couple of jobs now and feeling positive about making a fresh start [​IMG]
     
  5. absolutely. i have taken quite a drop in salary, which has made things tough, but even so,tons happier,healthier and with renewed energy for career development - and, in the long term, more scope for a better salary, not less, as I was HOD on U2 and there was not a whole lot of scope for advancement unless I went into school management which I would have relished as much as having all my teeth pulled with no anaesthetic.
    I worked first of all for a major charity, but had to move for personal reasons, and now in NHS and loving it.

    However... it took me 2 years to make the move, despite looking all the time via websites, e mail alerts etc... some of that was becuase although I did take a big drop in salary, becuase I was quite well paid in teaching and the main breadwinner, there were limits to what I could drop to. but - employers are often reluctant to take on ex teachers - who knows why but they seem to have us pigeonholed and so you have to work hard to over come that
    concentrate on transferable skills, be able to give skills examples in applications that someone can see the relevance of to the new role, answer all the aspects of the JD in your applications, do your research and homework on what you are applying for ultra thoroughly and be able to explain, in a positive constructive way, why you want a change. Applications in the non-school world are much more ' I introduced ..... ' ' I managed this succesfully by..' etc etc - you have to be prepared to blow your own trumpet a bit more than we tradiitonally do in teaching, as you may not get a chance to show what you can do as you would in say a demo lesson. Make sure your presentation skills are good enough for interview presentations. if you can spare the time at all try to get some voluntary experience or work experience in some area linked to what you think you want to do - it will show your commitment, help you get knowledge you need and give you things more directly applicable to talk about on forms or at interview.

    guardian jobs is good and you can set up a profile for job alerts, localauthority websites,other public sector body websites, think about things like civil service fasttrack programme or nhs grad entry programme if you can afford it and have an interest ( don't need to be a new or recent grad) many large bodies like charities have own websites some with job alert systems - but be aware that many many contracts are fixed term - and think about your pension - hence why other public sector bodies a good idea in that respect - and take advice on pension if you leave -you may want to leave it alone while you get re-established and so on before you transfer it.
     
  6. Thank you for all the info and advice celticchick. I think health is a big factor in teaching, I feel much healthier now I am not teaching, I was working lots of strange hours which resulted in me not eating proper meals and basically living on junk food. I now make sure I take the time to cook healthy meals for myself everyday, something which I had never had time to do before.
    I am just updating my cv for applications, so all the information you mentioned in your post will be really helpful. I have considered the possibilty of jobs within the NHS, I regularly look on the NHS jobs website to see what it is available. Will just keep trying and see what happens.
    I live in hope [​IMG]
    Dancing Daisy
     

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