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Levels ?

Discussion in 'Computing and ICT' started by madcat, May 2, 2012.

  1. madcat

    madcat Occasional commenter

    Just thinking about , starting to consider doing rough drafts of some of my y9 reports. where I currently have to give levels and I wondered
    When/If there is no set programme of study will we still be expected to make up;levels for the little darlings.
    Sorry some bad teacher barged in there and took over my keyboard. What I , of course, meant to say was
    When/If there is no set programme of study will we still be expected to devise and carry out extensive and exhaustive formative and final assessments in order to produce accurate leveling information for my hard working and delightful students
     
  2. madcat

    madcat Occasional commenter

    Just thinking about , starting to consider doing rough drafts of some of my y9 reports. where I currently have to give levels and I wondered
    When/If there is no set programme of study will we still be expected to make up;levels for the little darlings.
    Sorry some bad teacher barged in there and took over my keyboard. What I , of course, meant to say was
    When/If there is no set programme of study will we still be expected to devise and carry out extensive and exhaustive formative and final assessments in order to produce accurate leveling information for my hard working and delightful students
     
  3. I suspect you won't need to use the pointless levels, but will need to have some form of identifying current attainment, target attainment and how to make that progression (so that you don't get screwed when Ofsted appear).
     
  4. gavcradd

    gavcradd New commenter

    I'm going to take the opportunity to write my own levels, based on what we want to teach the little darlings and the skills that we think are important. I think CAS have some Computing level descriptors on their website if you're moving that way.
     
  5. You will (I presume) be expected to assess and measure progress for the little darlings. I intend to largely continue using the APP criteria which are, IMHO, the least bad of the levels. As more and more programming and OTHER computing topics come on* we'll adapt more and more of the CAS levels I suspect as well. That said, I do largely go on my gut (which is large enough to justify it).


    * Programing != Computing. Computing > Programming. Computing = {programming, how computers work, computational thinking, computer hardware, networking, etc...}

    ;-)
     
  6. I don't think Mr Gove thought about that one when he made his lovely "scrap ICT" speech! If we have an open and flexible curriculum, then everyone is going to have different ways of assessing depending on what we do. The current levels of attainment will have little resemblance to our new curriculums and will therefore be defunct. Personally, I don't like the Computing at School and NAACE stuff - I teach KS3 and there is no way that I am teaching a load of theory based, dull worksheet driven lessons. I did that myself in the 1980s and we hardly touched a computer. The kids would go nuts! I will be teaching programming, graphics, multi-media, web design, project stuff etc (although do lots of bits already). What will my SMT expect in terms of levels and assessment? I am supposed to write a yearly report on attainment. What will this mean if they compare current attainment to previous attainment? Do we start all over again? How can I compare my kids performance to national or local statistics? Benchmarking? Every school could be different? What do Ofsted expect? Have Ofsted been told to ease off ICT in this transitional process? It's all a bit of a mess really, isn't it? To be honest, I think we need a bit of clarification here. Someone in the education department needs to speak out in a formal and official manner to schools and explain what the expectations for ICT are. If it's do what you like, make it up yourself and no attainment to be reported at KS3, then that's fine by me.
     
  7. Is the right answer!
     
  8. magic surf bus

    magic surf bus Star commenter

    I agree with pretty much everything you say there sgraham28, but be mindful of one thing - if levels of attainment aren't reported, your subject's status drops in the minds of children and parents, not to mention other staff. It becomes akin to PSHE in the great scheme of things. This is not good when they're choosing options in Y9.

    When I taught KS3 Multimedia lessons as a bolt-on to ICT in a Media specialist school I insisted that Media was reported upon as a separate subject and levels of attainment were awarded, albeit based on a mixture of ICT and English attainment targets.

    Should the opportunity arrive in September I'll be rewriting the level descriptors to be more software specific, but would hope that they could somehow be related to traditional levels and estimates of performance. just to remain on an equal footing with other subjects when reports are published.
     
  9. madcat

    madcat Occasional commenter

    Yep, much as I thought - none of us has much of a clue what will happen or waht we will do.
    I'm tempted to go for "Spinal Tap" levels.
    Just so I can p' off the very smug Head of Maths by telling him , "Well , hell yea, my kids are working at level 11,'"
     
  10. Excellent, although I now need to clean most of that cup of tea from my keyboard!
     
  11. "Levels" look likely to go in all subjects - and good riddance; lets lead the way for once as we have been authorised to do so.
    <font size="2">"Although this [i.e. reporting levels] system is predicated on
    a commitment to evaluating individual pupil performance, we believe
    it actually has a significant effect of exacerbating social
    differentiation, rather than promoting a more inclusive approach that
    strives for secure learning of key curricular elements by all. It
    also distorts pupil learning, for instance creating the tragedy that
    some pupils become more concerned for &lsquo;what level they are&rsquo; than
    for the substance of what they know, can do and understand. This is
    an unintended consequence of an over-prescriptive framework for
    curriculum and assessment."</font>
    <font size="2">The above taken from the NCR. </font>

    <font size="3">
    </font>
     
  12. The substantive issue I see in all this is that, until something else takes their place, the word is O****d will compare progress/performance to levels and existing NC framework............. even if 'unofficially'.
     
  13. DEmsley

    DEmsley New commenter

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