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Letting them choose where to sit - bad idea?

Discussion in 'Primary' started by CarrieV, Oct 29, 2011.

  1. CarrieV

    CarrieV Lead commenter

    Mine sit in ability groups for maths and literacy but apart from that can sit where they like ( although they do get quite possessive of their maths places!) If they misbehave, they move! If anyone is unhappy with where they are (usually the girls because there are too many boys on their table!) they can also move as long as there is space ( I have 4 spare seats in my class so shuffling round happens quite a bit!) It's quite interesting to see the shuffling around that goes on!
     
  2. With my Y2s I leave them for a week to see who shouldn't be with who, and then do a seating plan for the carpet purely based on behaviour. It helps me target questions too as I know who is where. Their tables are purely ability grouped and that does have issues regarding behaviour, but fortunately this year behaviour on the whole is great.
    When we do topic work I often let them choose where to sit.
     
  3. My tables are arranged in threes so there are six children per table. I choose the sixes but let them sit where they like on the table. It seems a good compromise.
     
  4. minnieminx

    minnieminx New commenter

    LOL This is far as I ever go in a seating plan! I couldn't be doing with exactly which seat for which child.

    I choose groups for literacy and numeracy, purely on ability, but they choose where they sit. Now in year 2 we a do a carousel over the week and so they have to choose as the groups move tables each day.
     
  5. mystery10

    mystery10 Occasional commenter

    Although it seems kind and generous letting children sit where they choose to sit, it doesn't work out well for some children. They dream of sitting next to so and so, but little miss so and so decides she wants to sit next to x and y and not z, or x decides she wants y all to herself and fills up a whole table so that z has to sit elsewhere completely etc etc.
    If you have chosen the seats yourself there can be none of these disappointments for the more retiring members of the class who end up on the oddments table of unpopular and slow to hang up their bags children.
     

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