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Letters and sounds, assessment tasks, please help me understand

Discussion in 'Early Years' started by mystery10, Jan 27, 2011.

  1. mystery10

    mystery10 Occasional commenter

    I am reading Letters and Sounds, Principles and Practice of High Quality Phonics, Primary National Strategy.
    I've got some questions about Appendix 3, Assessment, this is not my field, but I do need to understand it. I don't have Notes of Guidance for Practititioners and Teachers.
    The way I read it, to move on to the next Phase you need to "pass" the assessment for that phase, and each assessment is a mix of different tasks. But what represents a "pass"? Does a child have to be 100% correct on all tasks, 90% etc? Do individual teachers take different views on this.
    I am not sure what the answers are on some of the non-word reading tasks, there do seem to be some viable alternatives:
    Phase 3:
    quoam - presumably child should read this so it sounds like foam ------ but the trouble is to a fluent reader they might read it quo - am, taking the quo as a prefix, a bit the same way you say co - agulation ----- not coa - gulation.
    kear - is the child supposed to read this as though it rhymes with hear? A child familiar with making the ear sound, but also with reading the word "bear" might be tempted to say something which rhymes with bear. Would they be marked down for this?
    fowd - is it the ow sound as in blow or fowl? How would a reading child know which - I can think of lots of examples of words spelt with ow which have either sound in them
    Phase 4:
    plood - presumably the oo sound is as in moon ........ but I naturally read this word as though it rhymes with blood or flood ........ what do you do about this?
    fowsping - again which sound for the "ow"

    Thanks




     
  2. mystery10

    mystery10 Occasional commenter

    I am reading Letters and Sounds, Principles and Practice of High Quality Phonics, Primary National Strategy.
    I've got some questions about Appendix 3, Assessment, this is not my field, but I do need to understand it. I don't have Notes of Guidance for Practititioners and Teachers.
    The way I read it, to move on to the next Phase you need to "pass" the assessment for that phase, and each assessment is a mix of different tasks. But what represents a "pass"? Does a child have to be 100% correct on all tasks, 90% etc? Do individual teachers take different views on this.
    I am not sure what the answers are on some of the non-word reading tasks, there do seem to be some viable alternatives:
    Phase 3:
    quoam - presumably child should read this so it sounds like foam ------ but the trouble is to a fluent reader they might read it quo - am, taking the quo as a prefix, a bit the same way you say co - agulation ----- not coa - gulation.
    kear - is the child supposed to read this as though it rhymes with hear? A child familiar with making the ear sound, but also with reading the word "bear" might be tempted to say something which rhymes with bear. Would they be marked down for this?
    fowd - is it the ow sound as in blow or fowl? How would a reading child know which - I can think of lots of examples of words spelt with ow which have either sound in them
    Phase 4:
    plood - presumably the oo sound is as in moon ........ but I naturally read this word as though it rhymes with blood or flood ........ what do you do about this?
    fowsping - again which sound for the "ow"

    Thanks




     
  3. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    The child doesn't have to "pass" the assessment to move onto the next phase it is intended to inform the teacher and the words are examples rather than a standardised test.
    If the teacher uses the examples provided alternative pronounciations would be acceptable.
     
  4. Sadly, many teachers perhaps do think children have to 'pass' one phase before progressing to the next.
    My understanding is that the phases were never intended as a means of differentiation, just a progression of teaching - first you do this, then you do that.
    The picture across many schools is of complex grouping and therefore teaching and resource provision - a bit of a complex nightmare in many cases.
    Parents of quick-to-learn children may be highly in favour of this grouping - but there are more ways than one of providing 'stretch' and 'extension work' whilst steadily introducing the letter/s-sound correspondences of the alphabetic code so that all children can keep together, more or less, for teacher-led introductions to the code.
     
  5. mystery10

    mystery10 Occasional commenter

    Well that's good to hear that the intention is more logical than what happens in practice in some places. At our school everyone is in groups - albeit for RWI rather than Letters and Sounds - and children get sent up and down the groups - they seem to want to keep writing, spelling and reading all at the same point for each individual child, whereas I would have thought there would generally be a lag between a child's reading, writing, and spelling, and probably in that order, unless you deliberately stunt the reading or the writing to keep the spelling in line.
    So despite there being a pretty able year 2, only a tiny minority have completed the phonics programme for Read - Write inc and moved on to what is recommended for all Year 2s by the National Literacy Strategy.
     
  6. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    I assume you mean Letters & Sounds Phase 6 and/or Support for Spelling ? If so RWI covers exactly the same programme but probably more effectively.
    Most schools don't use L&S or SfS if they use a commercial scheme
     
  7. mystery10

    mystery10 Occasional commenter

    Oh you might be filling in a missing gap for me there. I'm still puzzling at what point RWI stops. As far as I can tell the phonic part of it (grey reading books and grey let's get writing books) don't cover the kind of spelling and grammar rules that bits of L and S phase 6 and Support for Spelling suggest should be commenced in year 2 .......... but I could be wrong and would be very pleased to know if I am.
    I am sure the RWI spelling and comprehension programmes are good, but the school I'm talking about has not purchased them. It is also adapting RWI in its own way, and I can't quite tell how as any info we receive does not make sense, unlike the very clear information produced for parents on the RWI wesite.
     
  8. mystery10 - we clearly cannot second guess the circumstances in the school to which you refer but it seems as if you have some worries about this school and therefore may I suggest that you ask these questions of the school itself.
    There are probably a large number of schools who do not follow programmes to the letter, or according to the guidance, but the country is still 'young' in terms of synthetic phonics teaching and training.

     
  9. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    The Grey books from my understanding coveray, igh, oo, ow, ue,
    air, or, ir
    ear,

    ire, -ture, -ure, our, tion, tious, cious, able, ible
    syllables

    suffixes: ing, ed, s for plurals,

    ly,
    er, est, y,
    and the Year 2 5 PNS Framework for Literacy


    Recognise less common digraphs and trigraphs, exploring word families


    Routinely apply phonic knowledge for reading unknown or difficult words


    Use knowledge of word structure to support reading, including polysyllabic words



    Use syntax, context and word structure when reading for meaning

    approx equivalent to 2A gold book band which is above average for a Y2 child.
     
  10. mystery10

    mystery10 Occasional commenter

    thank you Msz, where do I find the Year 2 5 PNS Framework for Literacy please? What do the 5 and the PNS mean?
     
  11. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    PNS = Primary National Strategy
    http://nationalstrategies.standards.dcsf.gov.uk/node/110237
     
  12. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

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