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Lesson Observations with no notice - the only way forward

Discussion in 'Headteachers' started by Athena_Owl, Sep 16, 2009.

  1. I have just about had it upto here with teachers whinging about
    needing "5 days notice" (or "cheat-time" as I prefer to call it) before
    any member of SLT is allowed to even set foot in their classroom to,
    god forbid, actually check if anyone is actually learning anything.
    I
    say we put all Performance Management on a no-notice basis and demand
    that ALL such observations are judged to the exact same standard as one
    with 5 days notice. That way we can rest assured that every lesson
    taught in every school will be exactly the same as if an OFSTED
    Inspector were in the room. As it should be.
    ANY teacher who objects to this can only be doing so due to knowing, deep down, that they are a whinging incompetent.
    And
    if any so-called "experienced staff" (The ones we have to pay the
    most and with the least good health) fail such scrutiny, then get them on a Competency Procedure so
    intrusive that by the time they go off sick we'll know what they had
    for breakfast 5 days earlier. The ones who top themselves will save us money on competency agreements anyway.
    That way we can get some nice
    tame NQT's in, on a more reasonable wage. They won't complain and we
    can squeeze a few years burnout teaching out of them before they decide that they want to have children, or some such malingering nonsense.
    Who's with me?
     
  2. I have just about had it upto here with teachers whinging about
    needing "5 days notice" (or "cheat-time" as I prefer to call it) before
    any member of SLT is allowed to even set foot in their classroom to,
    god forbid, actually check if anyone is actually learning anything.
    I
    say we put all Performance Management on a no-notice basis and demand
    that ALL such observations are judged to the exact same standard as one
    with 5 days notice. That way we can rest assured that every lesson
    taught in every school will be exactly the same as if an OFSTED
    Inspector were in the room. As it should be.
    ANY teacher who objects to this can only be doing so due to knowing, deep down, that they are a whinging incompetent.
    And
    if any so-called "experienced staff" (The ones we have to pay the
    most and with the least good health) fail such scrutiny, then get them on a Competency Procedure so
    intrusive that by the time they go off sick we'll know what they had
    for breakfast 5 days earlier. The ones who top themselves will save us money on competency agreements anyway.
    That way we can get some nice
    tame NQT's in, on a more reasonable wage. They won't complain and we
    can squeeze a few years burnout teaching out of them before they decide that they want to have children, or some such malingering nonsense.
    Who's with me?
     
  3. Management already have the right to manage. This includes "no notice" drop ins" or observations. Don't let anyone tell you otherwise.
     
  4. Yes, but not where an overall judgement is recorded as to the quality of teaching in the lesson.
    Of course what is seen cannot be unseen, but the issue is whether it is formally used for performance management.
     
  5. You can record a judgement on the overall quality of the lesson provided you have seen sufficient of the lesson to make the judgement. The issue of advance notice of the observation is not relevant here.
     
  6. TheoGriff

    TheoGriff Star commenter

    I know of a school, an indy school, where everyone, Head included, gets a 10-minute observation every fortnight. Unannounced.
    There are a number of observers (SLT and HoDs mainly), each with their list of observees. Say 5 or 6. They just pop into a class in their free period, or while they have set the pupils some work that will take them 15 minutes (yes, it's a girls' indy, they will actually do it while you're out of the room).
    They come in for 10 minutes, having decided what aspect they will observe that fortnight.
    The idea is to get the staff so used to it that when the Inspectors ring up with their 5 days' notice, no-one will blink an eyelid.
    Oh yes, and also for PM. If several mini-observations come out negative, then mentoring of the staff is the way forward.
     
  7. Yes, but what is sufficient and can that judgement be used for performance management, as in recorded and placed on a personnel file?
    Both NUT and NASUWT vehemently oppose this if there is no notice.
     
  8. No unions I presume?
     
  9. TheoGriff

    TheoGriff Star commenter

    ATL.
    Nobody said a dicky bird.
     
  10. Teacher unions may well be opposed, but there is nothing they can do about it apart from stamp their feet. Managers have the right to manage.
    Provided the observations are conducted professionally and any feedback is given in the same manner, what does any decent teacher have to fear.
    I seem to recall Ofsted can only grade a lesson if they have seen <u>at least</u> 20 minutes of it.
    Lesson observations by Ofsted are no notice, no-one complains.
     
  11. As a 'normal' teacher, I would welcome no notice observations, as long as the people watching the lessons had been trained to observe to OFSTED standards.
    What happens a lot of the time is teachers that have been in the game for decades still think their methods are gospel. Sorry if that sounds a bit extreme, but it does happen.
     
  12. Athena_Owl, you are being far too lenient: judging according to Ofsted standards? Far too easy and liberal. All teachers should, I am sure you will agree, can and should be perfect all the time and should therefore be judged according to something more exacting: a teacher's version of the Book of Leviticus might be an idea. And why not use children as performance management spies, equipped with a miniature camera - the technology is there - you won't even need a no-notice policy because you could observe everyone every day without ever leaving your office! And don't forget, you should be checking up on what teachers are THINKING too. At the very least, bug the staff room and the smoking corner.
     
    sabrinakat likes this.
  13. I bet he gets given a tough time. I mean, you would, wouldn't you? Knowing how well that would play during your performance review. Not.
     
  14. mickeyforpresident

    mickeyforpresident New commenter

    In my school, I pop into every class on a almost daily basis, sometimes staying for a while. All SLT (who are all performance reviewers) also do the same for their reviewees, subject leaders regularly observe staff. It's seen as a positive thing in our school - not a threatening thing.

    However, observations for performance management purposes HAVE to havea minimum 5 days notice period.

     
  15. Figures...
     
  16. Kudos to you.
    What you describe above is exactly as it should be.
     
  17. All the above and more!
    We OWE it to the children to drive any teacher with any kind of personal issues in their lives OUT of the school.
    All teachers should be terrified of getting the sack at ALL times. That is the only way to get the ******* to do their jobs, after all.
     
  18. mrkeys

    mrkeys Occasional commenter

    "And if any so-called "experienced staff" (The ones we have to pay the most and with the least good health) fail such scrutiny, then get them on a Competency Procedure so intrusive that by the time they go off sick we'll know what they had for breakfast 5 days earlier. The ones who top themselves will save us money on competency agreements anyway. "

    Bullying
    "That way we can get some nice tame NQT's in, on a more reasonable wage. They won't complain and we can squeeze a few years burnout teaching out of them before they decide that they want to have children, or some such malingering nonsense."

    More bullying.
    I would love to have your school identified. I cannot believe that any sane HT or member of leadershiop team would express such comments.
    How did you achieve NPQH?
     
    bubbles40 and sabrinakat like this.
  19. Mrkeys, I don't think the OP is a HT and I think (s)he is being ironic!
     
    Urbanfaerie likes this.
  20. mrkeys

    mrkeys Occasional commenter

    Perhaps I was being ironic and maybe I have read OP's comments on other threads!
     

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