1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

lesson observation for job- year 2 introduction to plants

Discussion in 'Primary' started by RexyBexy, Apr 21, 2012.

  1. <font size="2">Hello,</font>
    <font size="2">I&rsquo;m in need of some help/ advice.</font>
    <font size="2">I have a job interview at a private school next Friday and have a
    lesson observation which consists of 12 year 2 students of mixed ability. I
    have a 45 minuet science lesson to teach on 'introduction to plants'.</font>
    <font size="2">Does anyone have any good lesson plans/ ideas that I could use? I
    would be very grateful. </font>
    <font size="2"></font>
    <font size="2">Becky </font>

     
  2. <font size="2">Hello,</font>
    <font size="2">I&rsquo;m in need of some help/ advice.</font>
    <font size="2">I have a job interview at a private school next Friday and have a
    lesson observation which consists of 12 year 2 students of mixed ability. I
    have a 45 minuet science lesson to teach on 'introduction to plants'.</font>
    <font size="2">Does anyone have any good lesson plans/ ideas that I could use? I
    would be very grateful. </font>
    <font size="2"></font>
    <font size="2">Becky </font>

     
  3. comenius

    comenius New commenter

    What about doing a group or paired jigsaw activity?
    You could give each pair or group (of 3?) an A3 sized plant cut up into pieces. They have to piece it back together and stick down. Provide them with blank labels so they can label the different parts and write what the function of each part is (if they can). You could also give them a plant pot shape paper or a real plant pot and they write on it or on cards to put in it the things their plants need to be able to grow and why.
    Then come back together and share their work - check they are correct etc
     
  4. ESLAB

    ESLAB New commenter

    You could show a concept cartoon at the beginning of the lesson to see if children think that plants are living or non-living. Find out what they already know about plants and what they would like to know about plants. Emphasise the importance of thinking about good questions. The rest depends what you're learning objective is. Could be naming the parts of a plant? Or the life-cycle of plants? Lots of pictures and/or real plants. Good luck!
     
  5. I'd take in a plant - perhaps a few - and ask them to talk about them. If you take in a few, you could get them to talk in groups about what they already know about plants. Number the children in the group and ask all the 1s (for example) to tell you one fact about plants. Then ask the 3s. Write their comments on a flipchart/interactive whiteboard.

    Then where you go next will depend on what they need to know and what you feel particularly confident/enthused about. Personally, I'd be going down the route of what they need to stay alive and healthy. Do they know what they need? I'd be getting them to plan an investigation to show the effects of giving the plants different things and seeing how they fare. For example, put one in the dark (deprive it of light), give one no water, give one lots of water, put one outside, etc, etc. Get the children to come up with ideas and say what they think will happen.

    I'd have laminated boards or headings on a flipchart such as 'What questions could we investigate about plants?', 'What could we change?', 'What needs to stay the same?' (ie everything else - only change one variable at a time) and 'What do we need to measure/observe?', 'What do we think will happen?', 'How will we record what we find out?' . Get the children to write their ideas on post-its and stick them on the relevant parts. They could work in pairs to do this.
     
  6. Thanks for the ideas I like the idea of talking about different plants and variations.

    I did have some ideas but not so sure if they are any good now.

    It's really hard when I have no idea what the children have already covered as I don't want it to be too easy or too difficult.

    I thought about introducing the lesson by labelling a plant and talking about what they need to survive as they should have covered this in year one.

    I had the idea of introducing plants and their habitat by displaying two contrasting habitats such as a desert and rainforest/ dark wet area and asking if they think plants can survive in these habitats and the children might say no as the desert is too dry/hot and the other is too dark/ wet.

    Next I would explain that some plants are very different and are able to live in these habitats and the task would consist of splitting the class in half and getting the groups to investigate two different plants (cactus, rubber plant) and have to figure out which habitat they would live in. I'd also supply snippets of info on each plant, magnifying glasses, and prompt questions to help the children decide and help them to understand why they look as they do.
    Then at the end bring the class together and discuss findings.

    Do you think this is too much for year 2?
    Becky
     
  7. Linda555

    Linda555 New commenter

    We were finding out about "what plants need to live" in reception, and we did the usual investigation, including putting one planted seed in the cupboard. When we investigated a few days later, I asked the children why they thought the plant in the cupboard did not grow, one little girl said she thought it must be scared of the dark! Sorry, I know it doesn't help you, but it might make you smile!
     
  8. If the school has a digital microscope (you'll need a play on one first), this has a wow factor. If you are mentioning seeds and pollination: Grab some 'current' weeds: dandelion flower and some goosegrass (stickyweeds, stickybobs or whatever they are called near you). You can see the tiny hooks on the goosegrass under the microscope (this looks great on a big whiteboard) and you can see how it sticks on someone or something. Although the plant cant move, its roots are in the ground, it wants to move its seeds far away so they dont grow and pinch its light/water. The hooks help this seed dispersal. You can look at a yellow dandelion flower under the microscope and see tiny bits of pollen. Ask a child to be a bee and come waggle their finger on the flower. Look at their finger mangified and see the pollen that has come off. If you want more ideas e-mail me on info@wildworkshops.co.uk, I run science workshops in primary schools (www.wildworkshops.co.uk). Steven
     

Share This Page