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Lesson observation criteria?

Discussion in 'Professional development' started by angiebabe, Jan 9, 2011.

  1. angiebabe

    angiebabe New commenter

    Please tell me you have had training for this role of 'observer'? If so then you should have the criteria and standards. If not, then can I suggest you see your HT urgently and get some training.
     
  2. Yes I do have the standards but it was more that sometimes I still find there is a degree of subjectivity. I think it's probably lack of experience as I haven't done that many but the more I do, the easier they become I guess.
     
  3. It is great that you are thinking about that degree of subjectivity! I was observed this week and, although there were a lot of positive comments, when the feedback turned to the areas for development I found I was being slated for the way I delivered the text I was reading (poetry) for a speaking and listening avtivity in KS1, also for some of my classroom management systems and routines for rewards (which incidently have been recommended by behaviour support but apparently are pointless???!!), and for asking children to raise their hands, I didn't follow my plan exactly (!), had too many lovely resources and so on .
    It was noted that behaviour was extremely good and my displays were 'lovely'. Apparently they had used the Ofsted criteria but I felt that the feedback was very subjective and frankly, insulting, and feeling very angry/ upset I went to the HT. I was being observed by a recently elevated SLT member and an LA chap who didn't feedback to me because he had to be elsewhere. The idea was for them to moderate observations and for her to gain some experience. I refused to sign the paperwork and my action point was to raise a concern at the mixed messages! I have spent the last few months mentoring 2 PGCE students observing twice a week and have done joint observations with the university tutor (and a coaching & mentoring course last year) - there is quite a miss-match between the way observations are carried out and more importantly fed back. The 'observer' was clearly uncomfortable but ultimately the message 'I got was I could have done it better!' and I don't really think that is the point of observations.
     

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