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Lesson Obs...Ofsted grades!

Discussion in 'Primary' started by din057, Jun 22, 2011.

  1. din057

    din057 New commenter

    Hello, have just had a Yr 6 numeracy lesson observed by Maths co-ordinator (Yr2) Bit surprised when he wrote a grade, using Ofsted scales, at end of observation sheet. Next day brought question up at Staff Meeting, stating NUT against use of Ofsted scales and Ofsted itself stating there was no expectation forHeads to use scales. My Head replied.."Obs need to be graded so I can fill in Sef or provide evidence of Teaching and Learning standards for Ofsted. Anyone else in this situation, or Heads doing the same. Advice please....unhappy Bunny!
     
  2. minnieminx

    minnieminx New commenter

    We use Ofsted criteria for observations. Why reinvent the wheel?
     
  3. din057

    din057 New commenter

    Makes sense, but why do they need to be graded?
     
  4. We use Ofsted criteria and are graded
     
  5. hcnip

    hcnip New commenter

    ditto...and i have no problem with it, personally
     
  6. minnieminx

    minnieminx New commenter

    Because just like the children look immediately at marked work to find a grade if there is one, teachers often want a grade for their lessons.

    I don't want a list of strengths and development opportunities. I want to know I am a good or outstanding teacher or at least that one that day at that time I was. Or, as I am supposed to think, my lesson was a good or outstanding lesson.

    OK maybe if it was graded unsatisfactory I might think differently...
     
  7. Grading is part of monitoring in school. It is fine as long as the observer has received training!
     
  8. din057

    din057 New commenter

    And if you are observed and graded by a colleague with no training, or experience teaching your age group? I would find it extremely hard to go and do an ICT Ob in the Nursery or Foundation stage.....or does having an Ofsted checklist solve those problems?
     
  9. minnieminx

    minnieminx New commenter

    On Ofsted checklist (or indeed any other checklist) gives you things to focus on. Is the LO clear for all? Are all children engaged in the task? Do all children understand what they are learning? And so on are all easy to see or not see in any class in any age.
     
  10. No problem with having the criteria used in an observation.
    Can see why someone is having a problem with a non SLT member observing them against this criteria. To do this, there needs to be a clear culture of peer observations with this system in place. Bit dangerous to have non SLT judgements being made due to confidentiaility surely?
     
  11. din057

    din057 New commenter

    What about the fact that the NUT says it shouldn't be happening? Is no one botherd about this...or do we just need Unions when things go wrong?
     
  12. But what about all the staff who are not NUT members? What applies to them?
     
  13. din057

    din057 New commenter

    Ok so I guess we are saying....it's all up to individuals to accept or not....so what happens if you are the one that thinks it wrong. OK beat you to it (Not being disrespectful)....change jobs? Off to finish reports...thanks for everyone's input.
     
  14. Milgod

    Milgod Established commenter

    Surely the NUT are just giving advice. They don't set national policy for schools to follow do they? As somebody else said, not everyone is NUT either.

    I don't see a problem with the grading thing, maybe because I have never know any different. The fact that is was not SLT (is that correct?) is a bit odd, although we have done peer assessments of each other at our school.
     
  15. I'm not NUT and we have OFSTED graded observations - I have absolutely NO problem with it - as others have said, I want to know if I fall in Good or Outstanding - back in the days when I was Satisfactory, it challenged me more to up my game, detemined to become GOOD, then got my GOOD so became detemined to be OUTSTANDING.
     
  16. I think someone hit the nail on the head about clear, secure culture of peer observation in the school - if it ain't there and no-one knows exactly what the functions of different observations are.....then it becomes very tricky. Cheer up Dino!
     
  17. Milgod

    Milgod Established commenter

    Although I have come to care less what my grade is. I have been given grades ranging from 1-3 over my teaching career and I can barely see the difference in how I taught. It all depends what boxes I ticked on that particular day. I prefer to see if my class enjoy school and achieve well over the year, not whether my L/O is displayed properly.
     
  18. becktonboy

    becktonboy New commenter

    and just like children who have 'Good' written under their work, you are none the wiser.
    I wonder if schools using these grades would adopt a marking policy along the same lines...
    funny, cos that's all I would want really.

    see http://becktonboy.blogspot.com/2011/02/lo-lo-whats-going-on-here-then.html for my genereal views on the value of most lesson observations and observers, if you are interested.


     
  19. And possibly the potentially harmful motives of the observer?! Just think about the scenario where one member of staff peer observed another and gave a grade that was used for the purposes of Performance Management or even promotion. Chaos!
    Sure not everyone thinks like that though.
    [​IMG]
     
  20. Erm........My LO being displayed has never been part of my feedback!! I prefer to focus on my teaching style and content. And as I have become a "better" teacher, my kids are learning more, are more engaged, more on task and standards HAVE risen. I'm not saying that it is down to OFSTED gradings but it has made me think and rethink as my career has progressed. Yes, it IS a matter of ticking boxes, but as a matter of professional pride I like to tick as many of those boxes as often as possible.

     

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