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Lesson help

Discussion in 'Religious Education' started by mr_free_sat, Jun 19, 2011.

  1. Hi there, I recently organised a visit to a local Church for pupils in years 4 - 6. I have very limited experience in teaching R.E and have found pupils to find this subject hardgoing during the last lesson of a school day.
    I though perhaps pupils could begin to plan and develop a leaflet about their local church using the internet and past information which they found out.
    Any feedback and additional information would be welcome!
    Thanks
     
  2. Hi there, I recently organised a visit to a local Church for pupils in years 4 - 6. I have very limited experience in teaching R.E and have found pupils to find this subject hardgoing during the last lesson of a school day.
    I though perhaps pupils could begin to plan and develop a leaflet about their local church using the internet and past information which they found out.
    Any feedback and additional information would be welcome!
    Thanks
     
  3. Have you ever thought of changing the time of the lesson?
     
  4. As often as possible its kept before lunch but at the moment due to a hectic timetable and events its having to be put in the pm!
     
  5. Hi
    How about building a model of the church you visited? it might engage some of your more ' lively' members of the class.
    rockgrrl
     
  6. durgamata

    durgamata Occasional commenter


    I've only done this once - with my son. There was a competition to build a model of any building over a long weekend caused by an election and a staff training day I think.


    I had lots of ideas of buildings but he insisted he wanted to make a church with a spire.


    My mum lives near to Thaxted in Essex which has a lovely church - one of the biggest in Essex - so we went round it and both of us took notes and made drawings. He was using paints to try to catch the precise colour of the flints - and we took photos too. He wanted to include the gargoyles and flying buttresses.


    I think he was only about 7 but he is quite a 'perfectionist.' I wanted him to use a rectangular box with a cone at one end for the spire but he wanted to put the ridges and patterns on it so I ended up showing him how to make paper mache.


    He was busy with it all that long weekend and the result was impressive, about three foot high and longer than that. The windows were drawn from the photos and the flints painted on, the cornices and stonework - including buttresses and gargoyles - made of paper mache and still a bit damp.


    The general 'finish' was a bit rough and uneven but that was because he was so young and he really did do it himself.


    We kept it for ages at a shed at Mums house, but it was too big to keep at our place and eventually she needed the space.


    I think the best part was how the project inspired him to look at a church so closely and really see the detail of things like the colours of the stones and the shape of the windows. We looked around inside too but it was the outside that really fascinated him.

    If you did a model in school could you make it really big so everyone could work on it - perhaps working in shifts with four or five people at a time?
     
  7. Helena Handbasket

    Helena Handbasket New commenter

    With regards to building a model to engage the livelier members of the class, don't forget you have the pupils who prefer to be quiet and do some writing etc. You could put them in groups and ask them to make a presentation of the church including making a model, posters, speech. Or even if you have access to video cameras they could film a presentation to go with it.
     

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