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Legal Recourse for OTT who have gotten used, abused, and shafted

Discussion in 'Overseas trained teachers' started by hollybridge, Nov 25, 2008.

  1. Ginluc, what country did you qualify in?

     
  2. 1) I've seen that at my school as well: 'We'll put up a few displays, print off some posters for the classrooms, give the teachers a notebook with all sorts of colourful handouts about Bloom's Taxonomy, then we can ignore the fact that the pupils are running wild, unmotivated, and don't value education.' We've already gone through our training, and I'm sure what you went through in Canada (and what I went through in the US) was JUST as rigorous.

    2) Exactly - we're expected to teach full-time, work just as hard as the 'qualified' teachers, and jump through loads of OTT hoops to prove ourselves. I've been teaching since 1990 - I think I can safely say I know what to do in a classroom.

    3) To value and accept what we can offer to improve the education of our pupils would involve the powers that be (at local and national level) to accept that the system is flawed, and I don't think they are prepared to do that.

    Good luck
     
  3. Yeah I know.....I'm not the only one, either. This school has a reputation for 'weeding out' the ones who don't agree with the way the school is run. I'm not too terribly worried, though, as there have been teachers 'let go' who have been completely inadequate and they've left with a good reference. I'm not 'outstanding,' but I'm at least 'satisfactory,' so I'll find work - even if I have to do supply work. First and foremost, I am a teacher, and hopefully, this new legislation will help me get a job in a school that appreciates what I can offer.
     
  4. I qualified in the US, hollyleaf; I've been teaching since 1990......moved to the UK in 2009.
     
  5. Supply work is pretty scant. It is, perhaps, the most unpleasant work that there is to do on this fair island. Better off in the mines or as a crash test dummy.
     
  6. Good point lol....Couldn't be much worse than where I'm currently teaching though. I've got applications out; am hoping something comes up.....
     
  7. BigFrankEM

    BigFrankEM Occasional commenter

    Perhaps you can help me on one point, ginluc.

    I believe that in all 50 states of the union, and English trained teacher who has been teaching for 22 years is automatically accepted by the state authorities as a fully qualified teacher without let or hindrance whereas my mate claims that there is one state, Puerto Rico I think that he said, where you have to spend 25 hours doing a conversion course unless you actually have 23 years experience in which case there is no need for these extra hours of training.

    Which of us is right ?
     
  8. That's a good question; unfortunately, I don't know the answer. Even though PR is considered part of the US 'territory,' they may have their own criteria re: qualifications.
     
  9. I believe that in all 50 states of the union, and English trained
    teacher who has been teaching for 22 years is automatically accepted by
    the state authorities as a fully qualified teacher...

    Not my question but I doubt this. It would have to be decided by whichever state the person was trying to get a job in. As a whole, America doesn't recognize a British BA because it is too narrow. (USA higher ed is about depth and breadth) A private school has the latitude to hire anyone, however.
    There are fifty states and Puerto Rico isn't one of them, it is a territory. Each state sets its own rules (no overwhelming Big Brother)
     
  10. Karvol

    Karvol Occasional commenter

    What absolute rubbish. US Higher Ed is about breadth and no depth.
     
  11. Karvol

    Karvol Occasional commenter

    There is always a bigger market for breadth. It requires less specialised knowledge and is therefore easier to cater for.
    Which rent-a-quote website did you pull that from?
    Wow, the cliches are getting better and better. Is there an original thought in there somewhere?
    Before quoting university rankings, you might want to look into how they are constructed.



     
  12. Let me guess... you hold a degree in shifty talk from the university of Northampton?
     
  13. After so much in depth study, no wonder!
     
  14. Karvol

    Karvol Occasional commenter

    Of course I do. First recourse of the incompetent - make it personal.
    Enjoy your proselytising.

     

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