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Left puzzled and rather worried

Discussion in 'Governors' started by newtoallthisstill, Nov 30, 2010.

  1. I have been a school governor for a few years but have only just taken up the role as Chairman.
    It seems as if the Head Teacher is proposing to make an offer to an under performing teacher whereby they will pay their full salary until August although they will be leaving the school at Christmas. This would not happen in the private sector and I am confused as to why this is happening in a school under financial pressure. The Head says County Hall know about it and are OK.
    Should I be worried?

     
  2. I have been a school governor for a few years but have only just taken up the role as Chairman.
    It seems as if the Head Teacher is proposing to make an offer to an under performing teacher whereby they will pay their full salary until August although they will be leaving the school at Christmas. This would not happen in the private sector and I am confused as to why this is happening in a school under financial pressure. The Head says County Hall know about it and are OK.
    Should I be worried?

     
  3. I would be...
     
  4. Any ideas why they might do this?
     
  5. R13

    R13 New commenter

    'It's not done in the public sector' you say

    Well apart from every week wth football managers - often paid for two further years of contracts, or chief exec' - always paid for any remaining salary years

    The Private sector makes all sorts of odd payments to get rid of people if a teacher at your school is getting a bit of that it will be, in my experience, something I've read a lot more about in the private sector than heard of in over 15 years of headship
     
  6. Google "compromise agreement". The employer gets rid of an unwanted employee by sacrificing some money (but avoiding having to go through disciplinary or capability processes), the employee gets to leave without a stain on their CV and without having to work through a notice period. Not so great for the next person who employs that person without knowing the background, of course.
     
  7. Certainly not confined to the public sector, though since one of the common elements of a compromise agreement is that both sides agree not to discuss the conditions under which the employee has left, I'm not surprised you haven't heard of them before. Also, long notice periods are less common in the private sector, so it is less obvious when someone leaves before they would normally be entitled to.
     
  8. MisterMaker

    MisterMaker Occasional commenter

    There are many posibilities. As CoG you can discuss non confidential issues with the head.
    Although rare, it happens enough not to get too concerned; possibily happens more in the private sector than you're aware. If the teacher has a permanent contract and doesn't want to leave they need a very good reason to go. They can't be dismissed unless there is a genuine issue. If the teacher has not commited any significant wrongdoing and the quality of teaching isn't a Teaching Council issue, then the alternatives are limited.
    I would, however, question the people skills of the head if there is not a competency issue with the teacher concerned.
     
  9. harsh-but-fair

    harsh-but-fair Lead commenter

    As CoG you should be able to discuss almost anything with the HT
    Paying a teacher the equivalent of 8 months pay would be an exceptionally 'generous' compromise agreement in my experience. The implications for the budget would need consideration.
     
  10. First of all thank you to everybody who replied. I wish I could say you had put my mind at rest but to be honest I am still rather worried.
    I too thought that 8 months seemed a lot and I do wonder why the school is quite so anxious to settle and end the matter via a gagging clause. It is almost as if the school has done something "wrong" to the person and this is the best way out of it? Perhaps there is something more I have not been told? I will speak to the HT once the snow has gone and things quieten down. Knowning him there will be a reasonable explanation - he always seems very capable.
     
  11. I've known of a case where someone got six months pay, and one which has just happened where I don't know what the deal was, but I wouldn't be surprised if it was more generous than that. Depends on the reasons and how long it would take to do it by other means - if someone wants to dig their heels in, you might be paying them their full salary for a very long time unless you arrange a compromise.

    A compromise agreement also means a clean break for both sides, no recourse to an industrial tribunal, so it's often the best way out even if the employee could be legitimately dismissed (I was told that it costs our local authority something like £6000 just to defend a case at an industrial tribunal, even if they win the case, so effectively they sometimes pay sacked employees not do do it).
     
  12. Rott Weiler

    Rott Weiler Lead commenter Forum guide

    Bear in mind that it's not 8 months "extra" salary the teacher will be given, but 5 months. If the teacher were given notice now then under the normal conditions of service applying to all teachers they would have to be paid until 31st March.
     
  13. Middlemarch

    Middlemarch Star commenter

    Schools which pay for LA personnel support (and most of them do) are usually told that they will only get legal support (including the paying of court, tribunal, etc costs - which can be enormous) if they agree to take LA personnel advice.
    Having been in receipt of 'We recommend a compromise agreement whereby the member of staff gets two terms' pay in lieu of notice rather than try to sack them', I'm certain that this will be the case here.
     
  14. This has happened three times in the last two years at my school. I think it is definitely a man management issue. The trouble is, no discussion is allowed and so you don't get to the bottom of it. Rumour has it that unpopular teachers are targeted and hassled until they are glad to get out. The turnover in teachers since the new head has taken overis heavy and it seems that good teachers are going.
     

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