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Leaving your children on their own - how old?

Discussion in 'Personal' started by headforheights, Feb 24, 2011.

  1. Oh, the good old Ingoldmels Theme Park!
    I think it is known as Fantasy Island now, the kids round our way have reffered to it as "f.anny" island - at least that's what I thought they were meaning!!
     
  2. anon2799

    anon2799 New commenter

    Igoldmelinos. I thought fantasy island burnt down?
     
  3. No, don't think so - unless it's very recent!
    I went to Skeggy Butlins the other year & when we drove past it was still as busy as ever!
     
  4. magic surf bus

    magic surf bus Star commenter

    As for leaving kids on their own, I think ours were given front door keys in Year 7, and expected to amuse themselves 'til we got home.
    My eldest refused to go on holiday with us at 16 so we left her at home for a fortnight with food and some cash and went abroad. Strict rule, no more than two friends round at any time. Needless to say the front door had barely shut when the parties began. We returned home to find the wheelie bin overflowing with empty cans and bottles, strange beer-like splashes on the lounge walls, an anonymous note from someone nearby complaining about loud outdoor revels at 4am, and a complaint from a rather snooty neighbour up up the road about being told to 'F*** Off' by some sloshed miscreant. Oddly enough, the closest neighbours had no complaints.
    After a suitable b*ll*cking, the eldest toned things down the following year. The parties were only held indoors (full details to be seen on MySpace and YouTube afterwards) and the only detectable damage was finding the fridge door held in place by sellotape when we returned. We considered ourselves fortunate.
    It's a rite of passage, a necessary pain barrier. Just grit your teeth and get on with it.
     
  5. anon2799

    anon2799 New commenter

    Oh god, that's where half my school goes on holiday.
     
  6. anon2799

    anon2799 New commenter

    Skeggy Butlins I meant, not Magic surf bus' house.
     
  7. Oooh that was rather brave! I don't think I would have done that!
    As said previously though, it depends on the child and how sensible he/she is.
     
  8. magic surf bus

    magic surf bus Star commenter

    You were probably one of the few people that didn't turn up at my house that summer then ;-)
     
  9. Ha! I was going to say, I don't think he would put up 150+ children after what happened previously!
    It's not that bad actually there!
    It's quite expensive though, so that probably put's off all the 'owt for nowters'.
     
  10. magic surf bus

    magic surf bus Star commenter

    I think the saving grace was having bombproof vinyl plank effect floors downstairs, and locks on the bedroom doors. Carpets? Forget it.
    It's a difficult choice to make - potential parties at home versus a totally miserable sod dragging around on holiday for a fortnight. We chose the former.
     
  11. Is your daughter quite sensible? Or did you expect this could happen but prefer it to the latter?
     
  12. anon2799

    anon2799 New commenter

    Not many of the kids actually go on holiday but they go there in te
    Time. Even so I was shocked at how expensive it was. One of our split families saves on cost by going with exs, new partners and all 6 kids ( from various permutations of the relationship) mind boggling.
     
  13. magic surf bus

    magic surf bus Star commenter

    She's quite sensible now, but at the time she wasn't, and we could have bet money on it happening. Sharing a camper van with her for a fortnight in a teenage strop was too horrible to contemplate. Sometimes you just have to let them get it out of their system. As I've said before, the toughest part of being a parent is knowing when to let go.
     
  14. It cost £1700 last year for me, my OH, sister, sister's husband, sister's kids, my dad and my dad's OH!
    I could not believe how much it cost and that's not even including food!
    I have always wondered about the term time thing, kids take time out of school for holiday's abroad - but do school let them take it out for holiday's in England?
     
  15. Yes I agree, even though I'm not a parent yet myself!
    My Mum found this difficult when I was in the armed forces and at Uni, getting phone calls from her every second!
     
  16. anon2799

    anon2799 New commenter

    Yes, otherwise they wOuodnt be able to afford a holiday. Having said that it's probably cheaper to go abroad, although the cost of passports is pretty prohibitive.
     
  17. I keep trying to think of what area your school is in! That sounds very close to me!
     
  18. anon2799

    anon2799 New commenter

    Couldn't say, wouldn't want to identify myself. I'm infamous lol.
     
  19. How did your son get on in the end?
     
  20. I find the whole issue of leaving youngish children on their own extremely difficult.
    My daughter is 10 and I'm building up to it in very small increments. I just drop her outside the door of her dance class now, rather than taking her inside. Over half term I had to nip out to post a letter (5 minutes max) and left her in the house with her 13 year old brother.
    This will now continue for the next 12 months or so, with her being left on her own for gradually longer periods of time until we're ready to let her walk home on her own during the last half term of year 6.
    I often wonder how on earth my mum used to cope when my brother and I used to disappear for hours on end - I'd be a complete wreck if my kids did that to me.

     

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