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Leaving teaching?

Discussion in 'Professional development' started by stormysky, Apr 28, 2009.

  1. stormysky

    stormysky New commenter

    I'm coming up to the 2nd year of my teaching career as an qualified teacher. I've been at the same school since i got my first post. I love being in the classroom but everything else just isn't for me. I don't want to work 6 days a week to do my job properly; I don't want to constantly feel like I'm not doing everything well, I don't want to feel 'behind' all the time and I want my life back!
    So... do I try another school? Or do I try a dofferent type of school e.g. a PRU? Or do I leave teaching alltogether? It's not that I want to leave teaching, I think that really I like most aspects of it and I'm wondering if it's just my school, or rather dept?

    Argh! Help!
     
  2. stormysky

    stormysky New commenter

    I'm coming up to the 2nd year of my teaching career as an qualified teacher. I've been at the same school since i got my first post. I love being in the classroom but everything else just isn't for me. I don't want to work 6 days a week to do my job properly; I don't want to constantly feel like I'm not doing everything well, I don't want to feel 'behind' all the time and I want my life back!
    So... do I try another school? Or do I try a dofferent type of school e.g. a PRU? Or do I leave teaching alltogether? It's not that I want to leave teaching, I think that really I like most aspects of it and I'm wondering if it's just my school, or rather dept?

    Argh! Help!
     
  3. Felt like you too, but just succeeded in getting a teaching job three days a week. Managing to survive on the pay and totally regained my enthusiasm. Look at the options available to you - another job may mean a big pay cut anyway.
     
  4. I know how you feel...but agree with the last post. Many other jobs will not give you a good pay. I am so tired of all the stress. Of beating myself up over things that havent gone well. I am only jobshare 3 days a week and tbh, the pressure is just the same. The only difference is, that physically, you have less work. I have often thought - if i dont do this, what can i do? and the only thing i can think of is maybe to go into Learning support or take a secondment. Another thing you could do is have a career break. In Scotland you can come back to your job. but you obviously wouldnt be paid but it would free up time for something else. What about setting up your own business or going into the nursery sector?
     
  5. I think the swill-soused swine who set education policy in the UK should consider buying out those who have been cast on the scrap heap by a lack of demand or through ill health. How would that work? Tax credits or training vouchers based on years of service should be dispensed as freely as expenses claims at westminster, with much more justification and a greater level of benefit to the wider community. After all, who has served societry better, a failure as a policy maker or a public servant failed by a system which is not fit for purpose?
     
    SarahJayne66 likes this.
  6. Hi
    I know it's not quite the same subject, but I've been teaching for three years and have spent the last two wondering about getting out and teaching in Australia - could you tell me what it's really like? ( I have a ten year old daughter).
    I know all about the visa process, etc, but am put off because I can't find anyone to tell me if teaching there has all the same problems as here!
     
  7. I think it would be worth trying another school before you leave teaching. You may miss the students and the status more than you think.
     
  8. stormysky
    I'm in a similar position. Been qualified for 2 years, worked at the same school since. I thought the holidays would be nice but the working pattern is so unbalanced - you're either snowed under and working 50-60 hrs per week or you're on holiday. I'm still not used to that. Plus I want to take holidays when I want them and not at the most expensive (and child riddled) time of the year.
    I've been looking around for a few months now, mostly working for the local council or non-teaching roles in other schools. If like me you enjoy working with the kids but get really ****** off with the pressure, the pettiness and the bureaucracy, maybe community work's an avenue? Not necessarily stable money but a lot more rewarding.
    Hope it goes well!
     
  9. avoca75

    avoca75 New commenter

    I think there are many newly qualified teachers in the same situation and each deal with it in a way that suits their needs.
    You say you love being in the classroom and you may miss it if you left to do something else. Perhaps finding another school would help to decide if its just the whole package of teaching or how your present school is lead and organised.
    If you decide you want to leave teaching I would suggest you start putting together an 'exit plan'.
    What alternatives are you considering ,would you need to do further courses or retraining? Is there perhaps a way you could 'dip your toe in the water' by trying out some options for a day or two perhaps unpaid during the summer break?
    Bear in mind too your income may reduce so you need to ensure you will have the means to cover your outgoings whilst you make the transition
    I am now in my 50s and cut my hours to three days part-time in 2007 so I could retrain and earn at the same time.
    I will leave primary teaching completely in July 2010 and move into my new career in my own business.
    However I work with colleagues who are plainly unhappy and discontented in teaching but who simply drift along and do nothing to change things.
    Whatever you decide to do I wish you well.
     
  10. Ezzie

    Ezzie Occasional commenter

    Am in mid 40's too (well, if I'm honest, in lates 40's!) Have had enough of jumping through hoops to tick boxes for SMT to look good, children are getting more and more bolshy and resent doing school work on my precious Sundays. However, have mortgage, credit card and 2 teenagers to support so really stuck, can't afford to give it up and not qualified to do anything else. Sob!!
     
  11. So many people want to leave teaching, and yet so many want to become teachers too. Why I wonder? Are we now part of a crushing system of uniformity and mediocrity, which promotes bureaucracy over inspiration? And you don't get to find it out until enter the profession? Or is it the school or college? Any thoughts?
     
  12. I think a lot of people think of teaching as a career where you can "give something back", and I know I went into the profession thinking that young people would soak up my knowledge and really appreciate everything I do for them. I was told multiple times during the application process and my PGCE that teaching was hard and the main challenge was behaviour, yet I always fobbed it off saying "oh it will be different for me".
    I haven't been able to secure a permanent post in teaching just as the jobs haven't come my way and i've completed 2 years doing maternity covers, supply and fixed term contracts and i'm tired of not feeling secure. I took the decision to leave teaching now as my contract hasn't been renewed and to be honest I want my life back.
    I do have problems with behaviour management and am really bothered about SMT seemingly never doing anything about it. I am also having issues with staff being unsupportive and i've just generally had enough. My current school is "outstanding" although pupils seem to run riot and not get any sanctions for poor behaviour. I've never worked anywhere with such ungrateful people and thats not what I want.
    So i'm going to be yet another statistic by leaving teaching after 2 years, but its not been an easy ride and I wish i'd listened to advice and left the profession during my PGCE year, still I've learned a lot about myself and grown stronger because of it. I don't see myself ever returning and have secured a great job in industry that I can't wait to leave work on my desk at 5pm and start again at 9am each day, bliss!!
     
  13. this is an interesting thread, which I confess I didn't stumble on accidentally. I think a lot of teachers feel the same Lor as a career where you can give something bac, however it can also be a job that really takes it out of you
    I do have problems with behaviour management and am really bothered
    about SMT seemingly never doing anything about it. I am also having
    issues with staff being unsupportive and i've just generally had
    enough. My current school is "outstanding" although pupils seem to run
    riot and not get any sanctions for poor behaviour. I've never worked
    anywhere with such ungrateful people and thats not what I want.

    This could describe exactly where I work, we got Ofsteded March this year (only a day "spot inspection") and there was a staff night out to celebrate, to which I didn't go it somehow left a bitter taste in my mouth.
    I am still in teaching but am planning an exit; I moved from one school last year where I loved the kids but my new HoD was a bully as was the headteacher and after battling the pair of them for two years I left for another school. Unfortunately I have ended up with a HoD much worse than the prior one (she reduced another teacher in the dept to tears shouting at her when she wanted to leave a meeting 20 mins early to go to the hospital for a brain tumour scan how callous can you get?) and although the staff are "polite and friendly" I cannot say I have any real friends at all where I am.
    In 9 months time I will have paid off my mortgage, I am in my mid-30's so conscious that a career change needs to be fairly iminent. I am thinking of going into physiotherapy and would have to go back to uni' for a 3 year course Although I wouldn't get the pay I am on now nor the holidays I doubt very much I would get the same stress either so I think it could be a good trade off.
    I think it is "easier to plod along in the same job but I don't want to be a person that looks back with regret nor wishes they had done something else. I would love to hear from anyone else that has left teaching, what they did, whether they are happy (as you lor) with their decision.


     
  14. As I can sympathise with you I feel I must reply. I've only just completed my NQT year and feel that i'll be leaving the profession next year. I had my doubts through my PGCE as well as alot during this year and when I left my previous job someone said something like 'will probably see you back again' and I laughed it off but even then I had a deep suspicion they would be right and guess what - they are, I can't stop thinking about my old job during these summer holidays. At one point I regretted going into teaching but then again it's what I wanted to do at the time and it's given me alot of skills. I do miss adult relationships desperately, hate doing things for the sake of it, ticking all the boxes and i'm dreading September already. I feel like i'm back at school studying and being around the kids with their type of outlook and attitude drives me crazy at times. It certainly isn't the career I thought it was going to be - you have to be able to do a hundred things at once, oh the days of being able to leave your work behind at 5pm.
    Whatever you decide good luck.
     
  15. I had been a lab tech then went on to do GTP where I was bullied by HT, then supply at a nice school where I finally completed my NQT year. I could not stay at my 'nice' school as they needed experienced 'A level teacher, so I looked for another good school.
    Could not find anything other than inner city schools, but then a technician job came up. I wasn't spending every evening and all day Sunday planning and marking any more - I had a life again!
    I am much happier now, although I miss the money. For a while I felt I should be teaching and what a waste it was training, but now I would not go back to teaching. When the teachers in my department moan to me about the workload or the targets they must meet, I remind them that I know what they are going through and they, like I did, have a choice whether to stay in teaching or change foor a better life.
     
  16. I have just successfully completed my NQT year, and I too have been considering my options. However, before I leave Teaching for good I want to try another school, and see if maybe it is just the school. I say this because I had a wonderful experience at one of my training schools during my PGCE, therefore I know that not all school are like this.
    I love Teaching, but not the long hours and having no life. I will try another school and if that still doesn't work then I'd possibly consider Social Work or something along those lines.
    I think in my case it is the school. I want to work for an inspirational Head with a real community/team spirit.
     
  17. I was very close to leaving teaching a year ago. Then I got a job in an independent school. Now I have time to actually teach, without all the frustration of the endless paperwork, chasing after pupils, and lack of support from SMT. I also have time to do the development work and pursue my ideas on teaching, which I love. I also have time for a life too. Check out the independent forum on here.
     
  18. 123Vanilla

    123Vanilla New commenter

    Help!
    I am 38 and have been out of teaching for over two years, to raise my two young children.
    I want to go back to work soon, but haven't got a clue what to do.
    I was contemplating doing a return to teaching course, but i am not sure i want to go back into the classroom....

    I have applied for a personal advisor post (with connexions)..has anyone else gone on to use their teaching qual elsewhere?
     
  19. Try being an Education Officer for some other organisation, such as a charity! I am one for an international orphan charity, which means I am invited to UK schools about once a week to give workshops or presentations about the work we do. The rest of my time is spent in the office preparing resources, supporting pupils and teachers and being involved in all other aspects of the charity. I know that the National Trust and a variety of other organisations have similar roles. I love it!
     
  20. This thread has really cheered me up and motivated me, thanks everyone :)

    I quit my job in April (mid NQT induction) and have since been trying to weigh up throwing away all the training and teaching experience (one year training, a year and a half supply, 8 months induction period) against returning to a job I found unbelievably stressful and soul destroying.

    After reading this, I feel much more pro-active in looking into new career paths. As many of you have stated, why continue slogging in a job you dislike and moaning about it when you can leave it behind and find something you love?

    Helenatsos, I have been researching the education officer role and it sounds fantastic. I would be very grateful if you have any tips. I would live to know if you applied straight from teaching or needed charity work experience, etc?
     

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