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Leaving teaching? Any success stories?

Discussion in 'Primary' started by foxymox, Jan 17, 2012.

  1. Hi, I've been a primary school teacher for 20 years, am now a class based deputy head and am regularly judged as outstanding in my teaching.
    However, for months now I've felt that I can't go on. I love teaching but find the relentlessness of the paperwork and marking exhausting. After a long day at work, the last thing I want to do is sit and mark, plan etc. Yet I understand that this is essential in order to do the job properly. I put my heart and soul into it during the day but I'm just too knackered in the evening!!! The thought of doing this for another 20 years fills me with dread. I also realise I'm not alone in feeling like this [​IMG]
    I just wondered whether anyone has taken the plunge. If so, what did you do? And is the grass greener?


     
  2. Jen g

    Jen g New commenter

    I know what you mean, I will be watching this post with interest. Best of luck
     
  3. QFE

    QFE New commenter

    Not greener perhaps, but certainly less stressful. I made the jump a while back. Still follow TES with interest as I have many friends and family still in education. For me it was the right thing to do - for many reasons.

    Being a class based Deputy is a pig, but given the current economic situation, I'd try fro a change of role first - advisory teacher? If you have a good relationship with your head, I'd have a long chat with them. If they have any consideration for succession planning they will take you very seriously.

    One thing I would say, is that it is a big old world out there and it has been a pleasure to work with adults rather than children (and I'm not talking about the pupils!)
     
  4. lardylegs

    lardylegs Occasional commenter

    When you say 'class-based', do you get any leadership time at all? I don't see the point of having a deputy if there is no time for them to do stuff.
    If it makes you feel better, every teacher in my school is ****** off with all of it at the moment, doesn't help that the headlines every day are teacher-bashing yet again. "Sack incompetent teachers! Every child must make marked progress every term or that's not good enough!"
    "No such thing as satisfactory! If you're not good, you must improve!"
    "Too many teachers pretending to be sick and saying they find the job stressful!" And so on.
    Meanwhile, Headteachers are all being sent on Ofsted briefings and coming back with stains on their trousers and handing out ticklists on "How to be outstanding".
    Oh, and we've noticed in my school that the briefing must include something about "Say one positive thing before you ask them to do anything" because HT is now doing the rounds saying, "Oh, what a lovely display you have there, can you provide evidence of progression in Numeracy levels for next Friday's meeting?"
    Meanwhile parents are adding the "He comes home saying it's boring because he has to do a lot of writing" complaint alongside "He hates his chair/he hates his lunch/he's lost his jumper where is it?/Why is he not in the football team?/He hates having to practise his guitar at home, can he just keep it at school?" type of complaint......
    If it wasn't for the sherry and the leftover Christmas cake I think I'd pack it in too....
     
  5. Sorrim

    Sorrim Occasional commenter

    Not greener, I agree, but I have got my life back!!! I was a class based Deputy Head too and had been doing the job for 28 years when I decided I'd had enough. I didn't leave teaching though. I went part time and have also done supply and 1:1 tuition. I have loved it and never regretted the change. My evenings and weekends are my own and I now enjoy going to work each day because I do love teaching- it's all the other stuff that finally wore me down!
    Sorrim x
     
  6. Itook voluntary redundancy because two younger teachers would have gone for my salary and they were good and had mortgages- my mortgage was paid and I would have retired within 2-3 years.I expected to do supply .....

    No supply happened - I was too expensive ... I have worked and earned doing school VLEs and other websites ... but love staying in bed till 9:30 or 10, Then doing internet stuff , CAMRA stuff, my gertie website, swimming, lately refining my yr 6 texts examples, uploaded SATs paper others have scanned and then playing facebook games. I get loads of weekends away and hols in school term time, dread school hols, and I hate the idea of any more contact with kids, unless I know and like them.
    It was APP that triggered my decision. There would not be a single child I could not accurately tell you what level in what strand in each subject ... and I resented the hoops designed to help newer teachers without my expertise, that I had to fit in with!

    Life after teaching is fab. (Now have claimed pension, too!)
     
  7. cleggy1611

    cleggy1611 New commenter

    Hi
    I'm a class based deputy too and I would love to get out but I can't afford to. I too am completely shattered after work but then have at least 2 hours of work to do after my young children have gone to bed. My OH usually just goes to bed and leaves me to it. I've looked on the normal job sites but couldn't afford to take any of those advertised. I console myself by thinking I 'm luckly to have a job. I too find APP a sickener, especially when we do it for every child for maths, reading, writing, speaking and listening and science! Hey Ho. There's no way round if but through it!
    God I sound depressing!
     
  8. gilly33

    gilly33 New commenter

    My heart goes out to you. I was an FE teacher and experienced pretty much the same as you have, although not for nearly as long. I am maybe not a good role model here as I have not really worked since. By choice though.
    I think you must be a fantastic teacher to care about your job so much but feel you too should leave if the job is costing you a decent standard of living.
    Teachers today seem unable to do their job through no fault of their own and this is awful when you train for so long and definitely have a calling.
    I have decided to educate my daughter alongside school and feel it is my only option. Luckily I am in a position to do this and am pleased all the hard work won't go to waste.
    I take my hat off to all primary teachers. You do a fantastic job but unfortunately it is not good enough, through the fault of government and bureaucracy.
     
  9. I too am watching this thread closely, hoping for some inspiration. I am leaving my job at Feb half-term (temp maternity cover). I'm only 3 years in, but have found teaching to be more time-consuming and more stressful than I ever imagined. Now I feel I am at a crossroads - still young enough to start a new career, but too poor to go back to Uni or re-train for something else. I also don't want to feel like the last 3 years hard graft have been for nothing. Really don't know what to do!
     
  10. Thanks so much to everyone for taking the time to reply. I guess it's a case of having the courage to take the risk and hope that opportunities will arise.
    From this summer, I can afford to take quite a big pay cut so at least that's something. I would dearly love to stay in education as it's all I know, and if it wasn't for all the beaurocracy, constant scrutiny, paper shuffling, endless new initiatives and incessant teacher bashing, it would be the best job in the world! I'm determined to stick it out until the summer as I couldn't bear to leave my class mid year but you have all given me food for thought, thankyou.
    To those of you who are in the same boat, you are not alone.
    P.S. Lardylegs, yes I do get some leadership time (2 afternoons) which is never long enough! But better than nowt. Just been for a swim and poured a very large glass of wine. Suddenly things don't seem so bad.......xx

     

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