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Learning to play the drums

Discussion in 'Music' started by oliverferret, Aug 7, 2011.

  1. oliverferret

    oliverferret New commenter

    My teenage son wants to learn the drums - he already plays guitar to a grade 5 and piano to grade 3 - so I am reasonably confident he will stick with it. What sort of drum kit would he need to start off with? I have been looking at electric drum kits as I am not sure the neighbours will share his enthusiasm. Any advice would be appreciated.
     
  2. oliverferret

    oliverferret New commenter

    My teenage son wants to learn the drums - he already plays guitar to a grade 5 and piano to grade 3 - so I am reasonably confident he will stick with it. What sort of drum kit would he need to start off with? I have been looking at electric drum kits as I am not sure the neighbours will share his enthusiasm. Any advice would be appreciated.
     
  3. You can learn some drumming on an electric kit but you will not learn proper stick and tone control. Most basic kits are fine to learn on, however paying just a little more than bargain basement prices will mean a better tone. The really expensive bit is the cymbals - the more you pay the better they will sound, simple as that.
    Most serious drummers - lets call them percussionists, shall we - start with "rudiments" on the snare drum and this is what needs to be practiced for hours and hours rather than patterns involving all the instruments. You can buy a rubber practice pad that goes on the snare drum which mutes the sound and allows the rudiments to be practiced without inspiring a noise abatement order.
    Another good idea is buying a "Flats" kit - drums with shells that are very narrow and fit inside each other. The advantage is that the kit all folds aways into two bags. Furthermore, the kits is quite alot quieter than normal kit and so good for practicing. Thirdly, if it's played with a band the rest of the band won't have to buy huge amplifiers in order to ballance with the drums.
    Flats kits are quite inexpensive - a there are several good ones on the Music Village web site.
    Hope this helps
    R.
     
  4. oliverferret

    oliverferret New commenter

    Thanks for the advice. I'm going to look into the "flats" kit. I'm still wondering whether it's fair on the neighbours though.
     
  5. You can get pads for all the parts of the kit that dampen the noise. There's even ones that sit on the cymbals. Never used them myself so I can't help you much more with those. Are you in a semi-detached/terrace or detached house? In a semi or terrace you can count on some vibrations going through the wall or floorboards to the next house. You could also soundproof the room the drums are set up in.
    As for the electric vs. real drums debate. Real all the way. Basically what rockmeamadeus said about stick and tone control. Plus electric ones just sound rubbish. Even the so called top end ones. Can't beat the real deal, you know?
     

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