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Learning styles and SEN

Discussion in 'Special educational needs' started by jack00, Mar 28, 2007.

  1. I have been on a super course today regarding sensory work with PMLD, SLD and ASD pupils. They were advocating identifying children's learning styles in order to motivate and interest the child. I did look at these at uni but now i'm not sure how I would establish which learning styles a child pefers, has anybody got any baseline assessment that would help to identify learning styles?
     
  2. I have been on a super course today regarding sensory work with PMLD, SLD and ASD pupils. They were advocating identifying children's learning styles in order to motivate and interest the child. I did look at these at uni but now i'm not sure how I would establish which learning styles a child pefers, has anybody got any baseline assessment that would help to identify learning styles?
     
  3. Thank you but not what i'm looking for, our children are unable to talk and have huge communication difficulties, it's very difficult to get their "voice" heard.
     
  4. I think a more appropriate way of discovering a child's preferred learning style, particularly children with communication difficulties, is to ensure that you provide a range of activities covering each learning style and observe which style they are more comfortable with. I think it's also worth pointing out that, whilst children will have a preferred learning style, they need to develop their ability to use the other learning styles as well as in later life they will not always be able to learn using their preferred style. If they have a preferred style then what they need is more expereince of other learning styles so that they become good lifelong learners, rather than being limited to a specific way of learning.
     
  5. I agree - teaching and learning in a multisensory way is best.
     
  6. I agree 100% vicki but this course was looking at playing to pupils strengths. A lot of my children are very low functioning and lack motivation. The speaker was charismatic about working with pupils strengths and ensuring some level of success, just really wondered how to put this into practice, I agree that multi-sensory is the answer.
     
  7. Some of our dyslexics are very gifted artistically so we would teach using this channel. e.g. spell the letters of a word using plasticine and make a small model of the word. Cut letters out of fabric or other materials with a texture to make words. Make own tricky word packs with words and pics.

    If they have strong auditory channels they can put own words on dictaphone or via the PC to spell. Can also play a variety of listening games

    If they are strong visually, they can use art as above, or play more word games on the PC to aid
    learning.

    We tend to try and appeal to their main learning approach first and then gradually incorporate a variety of other styles (as posted by someone previously). Basically we try to make learning fun.
     
  8. Re: teaching and learning in a multi-sensory way...

    Some children are unable to process/learn through more than one modality at a time, especially those with processing issues and those with sensory integration issues. A catch-all approach does not suit everyone, it is hit and miss and does not involve really looking at what works best for each individual child. Teaching in a manner that allows a child to use their strengths is far more reliable.

    Incidentally, schools tend to teach in an auditory sequential way and research has shown that the majority of children are visual learners. Vision is our primary -first used and usually strongest- sense.

    Best wishes,
    Aly

    Chair Auditory Processing Disorder in the UK/APDUK
    www.lacewingmultimedia.com/APD.htm
    www.apduk.org
     
  9. Hi there,

    For students with Dyslexia, try Tilly Mortimore's acclaimed 'Dyslexia and Learning Styles' ISBN 1861563132. Tilly has a great writing style, and is really accessible.

    Follow this link to have a look, there is also a Search Inside facility:

    http://www.amazon.co.uk/Dyslexia-Learning-Style-Practitio...
     
  10. Teaching in a manner that allows a child to use their strengths is far more reliable Yes!!!!!
    This is exactly how I feel about teaching and I am also experiencing the importance of visual learners. I fully understand that we all learn in a variety of ways but my experience of my current class is that we are experiencing amazing results using visual stimuli such as the plasma touchscreen. These are PMLD children showing consistent responses, how exciting.
     
  11. That is exciting. I home educate my son who is a dual exceptionalities gifted visual-spatial learner (gifted with APD, Irlen syndrome visual processing/perceptual problems and hyperacusis) and I learn from him every day how amazing it can be to learn differently...he has a photographic memory.

    Best wishes,
    Aly

    Chair Auditory Processing Disorder in the UK/APDUK
    www.lacewingmultimedia.com/APD.htm
    www.apduk.org
     
  12. dolfrog

    dolfrog New commenter

    Hi

    Aly has already provided a link to the main APDUK web sites Learning style section.
    We have a section regarding Visual-Spatial learners which due to reasons of copyright, and the need for authors biographies makes the articles less easy to access.
    So you may find these links more useful.
    our downloadeable working model of Learning styles
    http://www.learningstyles.apduk.org/lsworkingmodel.htm
    The Power of Visual Thinking
    http://www.learningstyles.apduk.org/powerofvt1.htm
    "Why all students need visual spatial methods"
    http://www.learningstyles.apduk.org/vsl_lks_vsl4all.htm
    Right Tools for the Job
    http://www.learningstyles.apduk.org/vslrighttools_1.htm
    and there is summary of all the articles on our site as downloads at
    http://www.infosheets.apduk.org/learnstyles1.htm

    I hope this provides a bit more insight.

    best wishes

    dolfrog
     
  13. Dear Colleagues,

    I am a head teacher in a teacher training college in Rwanda, recently I have attended workshops and training seminars on the provision of inclusive education in our primary schools. This is a particular area that we hope to develop in our current curricula and increase greater awareness of individual student needs, different learning styles and active child centered methodology. I appreciate all the links you have posted they have given me food for thought. I realize the posts are quite old here but I believe the information is still relevant, I would, however, appreciate any further advice you may have on this particular topic.

    Regards,
    Mukiza.
     

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