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Language Teacher wanting to teach abroad with some questions...

Discussion in 'Teaching overseas' started by oumselma, Nov 10, 2018.

  1. oumselma

    oumselma New commenter

    Hi everyone,
    I am new in this forum , I am still a NQT. My family and I would like to live abroad and particularly in the Middle East.
    However, I've got sooo many questions, I thought maybe I'd try here...
    1) Where can I apply for jobs ? I heard there are some agencies for it but I am not sure which one or where to look?
    2) Does the fact I have a spouse and kids mean it will be more difficult to find a job?
    3) One of my family member needs medical care, do you think that most of the countries in ME will have a medical insurance?
    4) Once someone approaches me, how would I know if the school is good or not ?

    Thank you very much
     
  2. tb9605

    tb9605 Occasional commenter

    The most popular agency with those on here has the initials SE. I've also used the one with initials TH and found it useful, though ultimately I secured an overseas job through an advert on the Guardian website.

    Spouse and kids shouldn't matter (and if it does, that may well help you answer question 4!)

    Plenty of teachers in the ME on here - hopefully they can answer your third question.
     
  3. Ne11y

    Ne11y New commenter

    Can your spouse work in some form? Some schools are often willing to offer some kind of position to a spouse if it makes it easier to employ you. It depends on local laws and so on, but it can be worth considering.
     
  4. walkingfred

    walkingfred Occasional commenter

    Welcome, and I hope you find the answers you are looking for.
    Some countries will not take teachers with little experience because of the Visa requirements- be aware of that when you start thinking about where you want to go.

    1) Where can I apply for jobs ? I heard there are some agencies for it but I am not sure which one or where to look?
    I have registered with Search Associates, but have had a job both times before they had finished my profile. Some people swear by them and the job fairs. I research schools, have a list that I would like to work at, and check their recruitment pages weekly and apply direct. Or apply on TES.

    2) Does the fact I have a spouse and kids mean it will be more difficult to find a job?
    It depends on where you are going. Lots of for profit schools will take a single person, if they can, or teaching couple without kids, as it saves them a lot of money, rather than a teacher with dependents. Depends where and how much money the school is trying to make.

    3) One of my family member needs medical care, do you think that most of the countries in ME will have a medical insurance?
    Check that it is in your package when you get offered the job. You should disclose this in advance though to the school; and certainly for China, both my OH and I (he came in as a dependent) had to do medical checks before we got here as part of the Visa application. I would presume other countries will want the same for all dependents. I don't know how much it would impact you getting a job though.

    4) Once someone approaches me, how would I know if the school is good or not ?
    Ask for a buddy at the school to email with so you can ask questions. Sign up for an account with International Schools Review. It is a bit out of date and sometimes very ranty, but there are not many places to look. Of course, connect with people on here as they will know the schools and some people are incredibly helpful and will answer lot of your questions.

    Good luck!
     
  5. 576

    576 Established commenter

    The private medical cover that is provided does not always cover pre existing conditions.

    If offered a job check this very closely.
     
  6. tb9605

    tb9605 Occasional commenter

    Whoops! Meant SA. Walking Fred mentioned them...
     
  7. dumbbells66

    dumbbells66 Lead commenter

    i have said this many times.... in all my experience i have only ever met 2 language teachers that weren't native speakers. dont think you are going to have a load of jobs available to you.

    think of it this way, when a parent is paying a LOT of money for their child's education, would they be happy with a non native speaker teaching them English? there are a HUGE amount of equally experienced and qualified teachers out there that would be doing it in their native language. remember you are applying against the world, not just a local pool of teachers that you would be use to.
     
  8. ljf1aber

    ljf1aber New commenter

    Flip it this way - non-native speakers teaching a foreign language (not first language) are still in high demand overseas. Both of the top international schools I have worked in have hired many non-native teachers to teach MFL. Native-speakers of course have an advantage regarding authenticity (accent, culture etc.), but non-natives often (in my experience at least) have a far better grasp of grammar and how to explain it to foreign language learners. In my current department of 9, 3 of us are non-native speakers - no complaints from parents whatsoever. Between us, we all offer a good range of learning experiences to our students. If we were a first language department, that would be a different kettle of fish all together.

    I'm also not sure that Oumselma said he/she wasn't a native-speaker.
     
  9. Mainwaring

    Mainwaring Established commenter

    When appointing MFL teachers (assuming equal competence in the teaching of the target languages) I found it an advantage if the teacher also had experience of the relevant exam systems. This might, though by no means always, mean that the non-native teacher had the edge. Our experience here in Spain is that local teachers, whether of Spanish or English, have a better grammatical grounding than ours.

    This discussion takes me back to a moment in my youth that still makes me smile. Mistaking the provenance of her impeccable English, an eejit classmate suggested to our French teacher that we might make better progress with a native speaker. It was the only time I saw Mme Tison (born in UK of a francophone mother, twenty years resident in France with a husband shot by the Germans for blowing up V2 bases) absolutely hit the ceiling.
     
    gulfgolf likes this.
  10. oumselma

    oumselma New commenter


    I am a French native speaker ...
     
    yasf likes this.
  11. dumbbells66

    dumbbells66 Lead commenter

    then you wont have any problems
     
  12. gulfgolf

    gulfgolf Established commenter

    There are indeed many non-native language teachers in the international circuit. Good ones, in good schools.
    I myself have been taught languages by both native and non-native speakers, and any difference in quality had to do with teaching practices, not linguistic skills.
     

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