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kS3 WOW lessons with chemistry as a theme for low ability group

Discussion in 'Science' started by suegtp, Jan 15, 2012.

  1. I am teaching a very low ability group last thing on Friday afternoons and I need some wow lessons to get them hooked.
    Last week we were revising pH and indicators and we made our own from red cabbage and they were transfixed they were eating out of my hand- but I am struggling to find things that are equally engaging for them.
    Any ideas greatfully recieved
     
  2. I am teaching a very low ability group last thing on Friday afternoons and I need some wow lessons to get them hooked.
    Last week we were revising pH and indicators and we made our own from red cabbage and they were transfixed they were eating out of my hand- but I am struggling to find things that are equally engaging for them.
    Any ideas greatfully recieved
     
  3. catherine_ann

    catherine_ann Occasional commenter

    How about anything with a forensics theme, distillation, chromatography, fingerprinting ect. you could always have them look at a range of colourless solutions and ask them to find an unknown based on their findings with known solutions. Another particularly good prac with low ability is flame tests looking at the coloured metal salts and identifying unknowns.
    Keeping with the acids and alkalis theme, I have done a Harry Potter themed 'potions' lesson where I have asked them to create different coloured 'potions' by mixing a range of acids and alkalis. Sorry its a bit disjointed, loads of random thoughts - lol. What age / level are they working at?
     
  4. Solubility - stirring & heating to get more sugar to dissolve in your tea or coffee.
    Adding 20cc of methanol (I think) to 20 cc of water. You won't get 40 cc of liquid. This experiment really fools them & they cheat to get the answer they think they should be getting. The best explanation / demonstration I saw for this was (in my placement school) when the teacher put 500 cc of dried peas in a very tall cylinder & then added 500 cc of sand to them. The pupils (and I as an NQT) all learned something that day!

     

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