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KS3 Levels question

Discussion in 'Music' started by joolsoakland, Feb 27, 2012.

  1. I've read all the arguments for and against sub level monitoring and reporting for music. We're now being asked to predict end of key stage levels down to sub levels. Is this standard practice / legally required / scientifically proven to be effective and applicable to Music ? Has anyone successfully argued their case not to have this included in a whole school "one size fits all" data policy?

    Thank you in anticipation.
     
  2. I've read all the arguments for and against sub level monitoring and reporting for music. We're now being asked to predict end of key stage levels down to sub levels. Is this standard practice / legally required / scientifically proven to be effective and applicable to Music ? Has anyone successfully argued their case not to have this included in a whole school "one size fits all" data policy?

    Thank you in anticipation.
     
  3. Just eat it , it's not worth arguaing about.
    [​IMG] MY EofY RESULTS ALWAYS BROADLY MATCH THE EXPECTED CURVE.
    I have too much to do to agonize over whether a student has got a 6b or a 6a. I hardly ever give out 7's and I've never given an 8. I've given out lots of 5's. One or two students don't quite make it, one or two go over their prediction, lots and LOTS of them maketheir prediction. I try to be fair.
    It's got a bit harder now as I stupidly managed to argue that the PANDA predictions for music given in year 7 did not take into account previous musical training and talent. So now I have a term to do baseline assessments and then I have to grade each student. Whatever, the grade I give them at the end of term 1, the school assumes will have increased exactly 2 levels by end of year 9. So getting the initial grade right does take some doing if you are not going to reap the whirlwind of wildy innacurate results later on. (However, as stated, you simply don't let that happen).
    It's MAD. But's not worth arguing about because you will never win.
    In the meantime - get on with some TEACHING!
     
  4. YesMrBronson

    YesMrBronson New commenter

    Never? We have about four or five per year group and this is at the end of year 8 (they start KS4 in year 9 at my school).
    We have about four level 7s in each class so that's about twenty kids in the year group. Most finish with level 5 or 6. One or two finish with level 4.
    I have the feeling that music teachers around the country have wildly different opinions on what kind of work is representative of these levels.
    We have one lesson to do this.
    Yep, my school assumes 2 levels by the end of year <u>8</u>. Pupils have music for 1 hour per week which I dare say is what you have too.
     
  5. Thank you gentlemen. Much appreciated.
     
  6. There isn't any national data for music. My LEA publishes data and send it out to all schools but not all schools submit their ks3 data so it is fairly unreliable.

     

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