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KS3/4 chemistry practicals...

Discussion in 'Science' started by anon1369, Jan 29, 2011.

  1. Hi, I hope someone can help me or at least point me in the right direction.
    I am preparing an interview lesson for mid ability KS3 Year 9s (so moving into KS4) which is an hour long and HAS to involve a chemistry practical.
    I am not currently in a school and did few practicals during my PGCE placements and as a result I am getting rather stressed trying to plan something. I have been given no indication of topics which they have done/are currently doing, instead I have got free range of anything to do with chemistry.
    I have no-one else to ask for ideas or opinions so any help would be much appreciated. I would obviously like to do something that isnt too difficult and not likely to go extremely wrong but at the same time is interesting/engaging. I am about to trawl the internet for ideas but any help you can provide will be much appreciated. Obviously I don't want you to everything for me, I just struggle to think of things whenI have been given an open ended task. And I really want this job!
    Thanks in advance [​IMG]
     
  2. Hi, I hope someone can help me or at least point me in the right direction.
    I am preparing an interview lesson for mid ability KS3 Year 9s (so moving into KS4) which is an hour long and HAS to involve a chemistry practical.
    I am not currently in a school and did few practicals during my PGCE placements and as a result I am getting rather stressed trying to plan something. I have been given no indication of topics which they have done/are currently doing, instead I have got free range of anything to do with chemistry.
    I have no-one else to ask for ideas or opinions so any help would be much appreciated. I would obviously like to do something that isnt too difficult and not likely to go extremely wrong but at the same time is interesting/engaging. I am about to trawl the internet for ideas but any help you can provide will be much appreciated. Obviously I don't want you to everything for me, I just struggle to think of things whenI have been given an open ended task. And I really want this job!
    Thanks in advance [​IMG]
     
  3. Can't think of anything obvious, but just remember if you use bunsens you have to allow 10 min or so for things to cool down. Once, I was doing a straightforward practical on dissolving with yr 7, and at the end of the lesson had a very grumpy head of year waiting to get her class into the room, as I was trying to get still fairly hot tripods, etc. cleared away.
    If you have some idea of what you are doing, http://www.practicalchemistry.org/ is a good site. All experiments are health and safety checked, which you should put into your planning.
     
  4. What about something on rates of reaction? Different groups could investigate different variables
    (surface area; conc; temp) then make a poster of results and the class can share results....
    You could do Mg ribbon and acid and time how long it takes for the Mg to disappear...... to change the surface area cut up the mg ribbon; change conc of acid; and to heat the acid, use cooled acid (ice bath); room temp and warmed (stand in a beaker of warm water rather than heating)....
    I suspect they want to see you have considered safety in a practical as well as your class management.
    Your starter is where you gain the engagement - perhaps show a firework clip or have a set of images of different reactions for students to put in order of speed.....rusty car; firework, cake cooking etc.....
    Give each group a set of questions - the answers to which must be on their poster - then you can get students to peer assess at end. E.g - What is the dependent/independent variable (or even just list the variables).....
    Hope it helps


     
  5. Roboteer

    Roboteer New commenter

    s20blu's ideas sound great [​IMG]
    If you wanted to add a touch of "magic" you could demo potassium permanganate crystals with glycerol. Place a small pile of PP on a tin lid in fume cupboard - add a few drops of glycerol. Nothing will happen.
    Repeat, but this time gently (stop if you get any smoking) grind same amount in a pestle and mortar (to increase surface area). Pile up on the tin lid and add glycerol - this time it will burst into flames.
    To start the crystals off, heat a glass rod and then place into the centre of the pile - this starts the reaction.
    Good demo for rates and surface area but also proof that you can start a fire with a cold liquid!
     

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