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Killer points when interviewers ask how you raise standards, pick up slack, engage learners ect?

Discussion in 'Career clinic' started by z_a_39, Jul 9, 2020.

  1. z_a_39

    z_a_39 New commenter

    I mention things like
    * Drill past papers
    * Focus on the mark scheme and how they can tackle this
    * I show what the exams are looking for
    * Put strong learners next to weak ones to pick up the slack
    * Group work
    * Assessment for learning like no-hands questioning and mini whiteboards

    The interviewers end up saying these points are average at best and drilling past papers and focusing on mark schemes is not the correct way to raise exam grades. So what is?
     
    armandine2 likes this.
  2. Pomza

    Pomza Star commenter

    Teaching good, and if possible, interesting lessons.
     
    SummerSkies likes this.
  3. z_a_39

    z_a_39 New commenter

    Please do expand...
     
  4. Pomza

    Pomza Star commenter

    Turning up at an interview and stating that you intend to drill past papers and teach according to individual mark schemes does not make you sound like a good teacher. It sounds unimaginative and probably very similar to the one they just got rid of.

    It’s all about the ‘broad and balanced’ curriculum now. You’ve got to say your going to teach creative lessons and deliver content in a novel interesting fashion, creating ‘memorable’ learning events. You might want to mention ‘enrichment’, ‘inclusivity’ and talk about how you’re going to help grow students’ ‘cultural capital’ too...

    I would like the bit you said about whiteboards and no hands up if I was interviewing you though.

    Tell them you avoid to much ‘teacher talk’ and that you prefer to promote ‘active engagement’, and you’ll be a shoe-in.

    You can thank me later.
     
    Last edited: Jul 9, 2020
    digoryvenn likes this.
  5. TheoGriff

    TheoGriff Star commenter

    .
    You are spamming a bit, putting this on multiple forums.

    May not be a good idea, as this can sometimes annoy...

    Just post once, not several times, is best.

    And also, while I'm on the subject of advice about your post(s), asking others for answers to interview questions is not a very good idea either...

    Apart from the fact that you should think through your own ideas, any answer given on line could be seen by other candidates, so you could give identical replies in the same interview. And be asked how you can explain this.

    Or worse, it could be seen by the Head, who asks: "I read that answer on an internet forum. Did you see it there too?"

    Don't think it can't happen, as it actually has!

    Similarly, best not to use a lesson from TES Resources either or the Forum suggestions.

    There was a wonderful case a few years back when someone asked for ideas for a lesson in the Primary Forum, did it, and the Head, who also reads the TES Primary Forum, recognised it.

    Not hard to spot it, however, as three, yes THREE! candidates did the very same lesson!

    And an even better example is the young teacher who did a splendid lesson, with great materials, but who had a few problems in the interview answering questions from the Deputy Headteacher about why and how she had designed and developed it all.

    Not surprising, really, as the lesson and materials were not only straight from TES Resources, but had been developed and put there by that very Deputy Headteacher.

    :):):):):)

    These were two friends of mine, that Headteacher and Deputy.

    Oh, how we laughed!

    Keep safe, everyone

    Twitter @Theo_Griff
    .
     
    MathMan1, ATfan, SummerSkies and 3 others like this.
  6. Skeoch

    Skeoch Star commenter

    ....and get the abbreviation right in your letter if application. Etc not ect. You might not think so, but errors like that can harm your chances.
     
    TheoGriff likes this.
  7. caterpillartobutterfly

    caterpillartobutterfly Star commenter

    This drives the more able batty...please don't do it. They are not there as unpaid teaching assistants.
    I assume you are secondary, but even in our prep we have a teacher who genuinely believes this. Their progress results are by far the worst in the school. If something wasn't on a paper in the last 4 years they don't teach it, regardless of the curriculum. Children are utterly switched off in lessons from January to July and start the following year with very negative attitudes to the subject.
     
    TheoGriff and phlogiston like this.
  8. Teacher_abc123

    Teacher_abc123 New commenter

     
  9. phlogiston

    phlogiston Star commenter

    Killer answers may not be what the interviewers are looking for

    What they may want to hear is a balanced reflective approach. Exam papers can be good for focusing on the final summative learning part of T&L, but something else is needed to motivate and engage learners they need the story or the application to get the idea on their heads.
     
    Pomza and TheoGriff like this.
  10. armandine2

    armandine2 Established commenter

    O.P. perfectly reasonable question and legitimate promulgation. Keep it up, it does you credit.
     
  11. DrJay

    DrJay Occasional commenter

    In my NQT year somewhere in the Midlands where most of the local teachers often say "we was" (lol), I unsuccessfully challenged students writing ect instead of etc., because that's how they've been taught. They even came back to me to say their English teacher said they were right and I was wrong (they might be lying). I left the school after my NQT year. I could have left the profession if all schools were like that. Not surprised the school has subsequently been twice adjudged as RI.
     
    TheoGriff, MathMan1 and phlogiston like this.
  12. MathMan1

    MathMan1 New commenter

    I keep seeing people doing that in various documents - it's as if it's slowly trying to worm it's way into being a commonly accepted alternative - but it's still wrong.
     
    ACOYEAR8 and TheoGriff like this.
  13. MathMan1

    MathMan1 New commenter

    Thanks for the pre-warning about this.

    It's always been something I've wondered about since the alternative would be rather naive or condescending - to assume, in effect, that I was the only person to consider using TES resources and that that school's HT or senior people never frequented said site either.
     
    phlogiston and TheoGriff like this.

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